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Barn Board panelling / Installing boards / wood on wall.


cherish50's Avatar
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03-22-13, 11:41 AM   #1 (permalink)  
Barn Board panelling / Installing boards / wood on wall.

Hello,

I am looking for step by step instructions on how to install barn board on the wall horizontally and what tools will I need?

Accent Wall Barn Wood Barnwood Design Ideas, Pictures, Remodel, and Decor

Attached are the pictures for example.

Help from professionals and anybody who has done this project will be really appreciated.

Regards

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03-22-13, 12:19 PM   #2 (permalink)  
I assume there a sheet rock wall already existing where you want to do this?

You will need some sort of caw to cut the boards to length. I would use a circular saw or chop saw but a hand saw would also work. A speed square or something similar to mark a perpendicular cut line across the board would be helpful if using a hand saw.

If you want to minimize the purchase or renting of tools I'd glue the pieces to the wall using and adhesive like Loctite Power Grab construction adhesive. It has a very high initial hold so you could apply a few lines of adhesive to the back of a board and push it in place for a few seconds and then move onto the next. There are many other construction adhesives that you could use though some require the piece be held in position longer while the glue sets which could require some nailing.

If you want to nail the boards mark the stud locations on the wall. Then hold the boards in position and nail into the studs with a brad nailer. I'm partial to the cordless type but the air powered ones are more common but require a air compressor to power them. Or, you could always do it the old fashioned way with a hammer and nails.

 
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03-22-13, 03:20 PM   #3 (permalink)  
Will this be "barn" wood, or wood from a manufacturer to resemble barn wood? If the former, has it been treated for wood boring gremlins? Is it flat? Is it straight? Is it all the same width? I install wood on walls a lot, and thus the questions. BTDT.

 
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03-23-13, 06:50 PM   #4 (permalink)  
I am looking to install the actual "grey barn wood" . I have not purchased the barn boards yet since I wanted to see whether I am capable of doing this project myself!
Does it need to be treated or surface finished? What kind of treatment would it need?
It will all be same width.

 
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03-23-13, 07:01 PM   #5 (permalink)  
Thank you for Pilot Dane for your response
Yes, the dry wall already exists and I am looking to install the barn wood panels.
Would there be any disadvantage of gluing it to the wall vs nailing? Have you installed barnwood panels by guling it to the drywall?

If I decide to install it with nails, wouldn't I need to install a base layer of plywood first? If I don't do that what if I come across a situation where I need to install a small piece of barnwood while staggering and there is no stud around for me to nail it.
Vs if I have plywood layer installed on the studs first, I would not have to worry about finding studs again for the barn board panel installation.

 
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03-23-13, 07:15 PM   #6 (permalink)  
Laying some sheets of plywood on the wall shouldn't be a problem. I think something at least 3/8" thick should be enough to hold a nail and keep your boards on.

 
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03-24-13, 04:47 AM   #7 (permalink)  
You may need to have one side of the used barn lumber planed so they will all be the same thickness. Be sure to check for nails so you won't ruin the planer blade. Rough sawn saw mill lumber isn't always the same thickness.

You'll also need some electrical extension boxes for any devices that are on that wall.


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03-24-13, 04:55 AM   #8 (permalink)  
How much prep work you need to do will depend on what you get and what appearance you want. It could be ready to go when you bring it home. Since barn siding is often weathered, different thicknesses, cupped or warped it's up to you if that is part of it's character or if you want it to be more "perfect".

Yes, glue or caulk and be used to attach the boards directly to a sheet rock wall. The drawback is if you ever want to remove the boards. Pulling them off will probably also remove the paper from the sheet rock.

No, you can not nail into sheet rock to hold the boards. That is why you mark the stud locations so you can nail into the studs. The drawback to this method is that you can only nail where the studs are located which will probably be every 16" along the wall. This is not much a drawback unless you have some really short pieces that end up between the studs.

 
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03-25-13, 05:22 AM   #9 (permalink)  
Barn Wood

The boards will need to be ripped on both sides to get straight edges and uniform width for a "course" of planks all the way across the wall. Nailing to studs will create a pattern where the ends of the boards meet. If you want a random pattern for the end joints, install plywood as your nailing substrate.

 
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03-25-13, 06:17 AM   #10 (permalink)  
This is exactly what I want to do with my kitchen backsplash, i will be interested to see how this turns out. Where are you buying the wood or is it literally found barnwood?

 
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03-25-13, 06:40 AM   #11 (permalink)  
Since the boards are not structural they do not need to be nailed at the ends with joints butting over a stud like you would with deck sheeting or sheetrock. The joints can be staggered randomly and it's no big deal if the very end of the board is not nailed. It's not exposed to weather and it's not carrying a load so there is no harm in the end of the board hanging as long as the rest of the board is nailed well enough to support the weight.

 
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03-25-13, 12:07 PM   #12 (permalink)  
I am hoping to be able to source it for free. But let's see.

 
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03-25-13, 12:13 PM   #13 (permalink)  
Pilot Dane!!
Thank you for all information.
So are you saying that for the short pieces, I would just nail them on one side onto the stud( sharing that stud for nailing with other long wood panel) and leave the other side of the short piece un-nailed??

 
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03-25-13, 12:16 PM   #14 (permalink)  
IMO, the pieces that don't have the end's nailed would benefit from liquid nail [or other adhesive] to secure the end.


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08-20-13, 02:06 PM   #15 (permalink)  
Insecticide??

Should I spray the boards with insecticide before using them? Has anyone else done this? Thanks.

 
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08-20-13, 02:23 PM   #16 (permalink)  
Kiln dried lumber kills any insects during the heat cycle, air drying lumber doesn't. Any time you use saw mill [air dried] lumber or used lumber it's a good idea to inspect it thoroughly and use an insecticide if/where needed.


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