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Cottage stove heat recirculation


FunnyguyMI's Avatar
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03-19-17, 03:29 PM   #1 (permalink)  
Cottage stove heat recirculation

My cottage has a boiler for heating as well as a wood stove, no furnace. When I am up there, I use the stove to heat the place. We currently put a box fan in the hallway to circulate cold air from the bedrooms on one side of the cottage to the living area where the stove is. The stove also has a blower that sends air past the stove jacket to heat the air and blow it into the room.

I had been thinking about installing a circulation fan so I could put the box fan away. Then, I thought maybe I could route some ductwork to the stove blower inlet, and pull it from registers in the bedroom floors. It would run through the crawlspace, pulling cold air from the back bedrooms and blowing it through the stove jacket, heating the air and blowing it into the living room.

The blower motor has two speeds and is rated at: .65/.45A, 2800/1800rpm, 1/70hp / 1/200hp. I didn't see a cfm rating on the blower. It is a Universal Electric Co, out of Owosso, Mich. i think it's about 40ft or so from where the blower is to the back of the bedrooms, where I'd want to pull the cold air in from.

I am wondering if the blower would be effective on that run of ductwork? And, any recommendations on what materials to use for the ductwork? And, any recommendations on where to join the lines from each bedroom into the single line going into the blower? Would it be better to have that back by the bedrooms, or up near the blower?

Thanks all!

 
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03-19-17, 03:37 PM   #2 (permalink)  
I don't think you will get any air back to the bedrooms with that blower.

 
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03-19-17, 04:46 PM   #3 (permalink)  
Welcome to the forums.

I'd have to agree.

Most of the blowers are just designed to move air around the stove and have no real power.


~ Pete ~

 
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03-19-17, 06:25 PM   #4 (permalink)  
Just guessing but I might try a bath vent fan in the kitchen ceiling with the exhaust connection going to a Y splitter to the two bedrooms using insulated ducting to ceiling vents in the bedroom ceilings.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
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03-20-17, 12:32 PM   #5 (permalink)  
The blower motor isn't huge like a furnace blower, but it isn't small either, and makes a good amount of air noise. I guess I was thinking maybe run a 3" pipe (inlet on the blower looks about 3") down through the floor and then tie it to a 6" pipe or so, which runs back to the bedrooms. Then, a Y and another few feet or so of 6" pipe pulling cold air from registers in the bedroom floors.

I had been debating running something like ray suggested, using a more powerful blower in the attic. But, then, after a few green beers this past weekend, it dawned on me that there's a blower right on the wood stove. And, if I could get that to pull cold air from the bedrooms, rather than hot air from right behind the stove, it might be all the solution I need. I don't need a huge airflow, just something to even out the back rooms a little.

I don't think it will cost too much to try it out and see.. I was debating putting a more powerful blower on the wood stove too, if the current one does't seem powerful enough.

I tried quite a few searches on the Internet, but mainly it was people talking about a cold air intake for the firebox..

Thanks for chiming in guys. I will try to post back when I get around to installing it, whether or not it worked.

Edit: Another bonus to this solution is less noise. Between the box fan in the hallway and the wood stove blower, it can get pretty loud! I recognize that less noise will probably mean less airflow, but maybe a more efficient airflow will yield similar (if not better?) results.

 
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