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Removing a Chimney


DanMonahan's Avatar
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01-20-05, 06:15 AM   #1 (permalink)  
DanMonahan
Removing a Chimney

Anybody have an idea what the average cost of removing a chimney would be? My wife and I want a non-used, non-structural chimney removed from our house. The chimeny runs right through the kitchen and a bedroom directly above it. Removing it would really open up both rooms.
Any help is greatly appreciated!

 
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Ed Imeduc's Avatar
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01-27-05, 04:33 PM   #2 (permalink)  
If its brick its not a hard job just a lot of work is all. one brick at a time. Have ply wood and roof shingles ready take off the top and fix the roof after that its take your time .


ED

 
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01-30-05, 05:21 PM   #3 (permalink)  
Gee
We had the exact same situation. An unused fireplace that was completely inside our house. Ran through 2 rooms. We got a quote for removing it and replacing the floors.
The quote was for $2150. (North Carolina)

We were considering it because we are not very handy around the house. However, I convinced my husband to try removing it himself. He just started today and it is going very well. He and my 14 year old son are having a really fun time so far.

Tomorrow we bust into the rooms. We will see how that goes.

So far we have bought about $70 worth of equipment (chisel, hammer, masks, gloves, etc).

Hope this helps,
Ginny

 
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02-08-05, 08:42 AM   #4 (permalink)  
OverRunMama
We need to do the exact same thing...

Please I hope the last poster is still checking these forums, I want to know how this job is going. My husband tries to be a do -it yourselfer, but this seems to be a very big job, we are afaid of tackiling it ourselves... We have an old farmhouse, that has a massive fireplace running up thru the basement -to the kitchen to the bedrooms & up the attic, we want to tear it all down and build new...& to free space up for these rooms. Whoever built this back in 1901 -had boards running thru the bricks to make shelfs in the basement, not a good idea as these are slowing rotting. We have never hired a Professional contractor, who do we look for, -a chimney man? I just need Beginner advice, all the way around. Please post if you have any helpful advice, thoughts, thank you!

 
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02-12-05, 03:24 PM   #5 (permalink)  
Gee
Well we finished today! So that is about 2 weeks of work. We have a baby, which ment we were limited to when we could work on it. Also, it is hard work so we found we could work on it for about 2 hours. A few days we did 5 hours stretches but we paid for it.

It is very dirty. You will be covered in suet and the house. Be sure to cover all carpets. You will take lots of showers.

Ours was not structural, so we didn't have to worry about any support.

We now have, we estimate, 1000 bricks or parts of bricks in our backyard!! UGH!

Good luck!
Ginny

 
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02-15-05, 08:29 AM   #6 (permalink)  
I took mine (2 story) down this past summer. I have a compressor so I bought an air chisel ($19.00). It made the job easy and took less then a day to remove it. It took another two days to clean up from dust settling etc.
Scott

 
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02-22-05, 01:02 PM   #7 (permalink)  
rking1966
faced with same thing in NC

We are wanting to remodel our kitchen and an old non-structural non used chimney is right in the corner, so it would be a pain for the cabinet person. I am going to have a couple of contractor guys I know take a look at it first then I'll see if maybe we can do it ourselves. I am too scared of heights though so don't know if I could do anything on the roof (it's actually 3 stories up).

Gee, how hard was it to repair the roof, floors, etc.?

-Richard

 
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02-23-05, 10:03 AM   #8 (permalink)  
Covering the floor in my was easy since the chimney was small and was going to be carpeted. If it were tiled or hardwoodd this would be more involved. I tore the roof structure entirely off and retrussed the roof as a part of the remodel so patching the roof was not an issue.
Scott

 
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06-02-05, 11:36 AM   #9 (permalink)  
kmdunningaia
Chimney removal -- anyone remember TOH episode?!

I am facing the same job of removing an old internal chimney at my 1920's colonial. The chimney is deteriorating so badly in the basement that it may collapse without any help from me.

I saw (within the last 2 years, but maybe a rerun) an episode of This Old House which showed the gang removing an old internal chimney. I would love it if someone could confirm my recollection of the procedure as it sounds as if it might be a little risky unless done properly. I'm not sure I remember all the details -- did anyone else see this episode and know more?

IF I remember correctly, they attached a short-ish steel bar to a length of chain (attachment at the center of the bar), then attached the [other end of the] chain to a powerful electric drill. The bar was lowered down into the chimney and the drill started. As the bar spun, it knocked out the brick. All chips fell down the cavity to the basement where they had to be shoveled out.

Any confirmations?

Karen


Last edited by kmdunningaia; 06-02-05 at 11:37 AM. Reason: clarification
 
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06-02-05, 01:18 PM   #10 (permalink)  
Just start at the top and work down.


ED

 
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06-09-05, 01:17 PM   #11 (permalink)  
paulam2
How can you tell if the chimney is structural or not?

I have a 35-year old brick fireplace that I want to get rid of. I'd be perfectly happy to do it myself (especially after the old-boy attitude that I've gotten from the fireplace, chimney, and masonry people I've talked to), but I don't want to start tearing it down and then find out that it's holding up the house.

 
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07-14-05, 06:34 AM   #12 (permalink)  
randyd
Same problem

I, too, don't know how to determine if a chimney is structural or if it's free standing. I'm about to remove a three-story brick one in my 200-year-old farmhouse.

 
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07-14-05, 08:25 AM   #13 (permalink)  
paulam2
I just started doing the work this week. I rented a hammer drill and took out the inside of the fireplace. I decided to do the project in two steps because I wanted to get an idea of what was holding everything up.

First, the hammer drill was the way to go. It went through the mortar between the bricks pretty easily. It took a good part of the day, and it was very messy, but I think hauling the bricks outside was harder than taking them down.

Second, I was pleased to find that between the inside and outside layers of brick is a stud wall with a large header. The firebox and chimney stand between those two layers, so there are a few studs that don't exist, but I feel very comfortable going to the next step, which is to take out the outside brick. I'll then add a stud or two where the firebox is now and cover the outside, and move on.

 
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08-20-05, 07:11 PM   #14 (permalink)  
Building Newb
I'd say Break out the Hacksaw

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08-17-09, 09:08 AM   #15 (permalink)  
removing an old chimney

Yesterday I removed a chimney from an old oil furnace that we removed. The chimney was 2 floors plus the roof and attic. About 22-24 ft. and about 18 x18 inches using the 4x5x8 cement bricks plus a cement liner. I used a air hammer (air chisel). I started at 12 and was done with most of cleanup done by 7pm and that took a few breaks along the way. Without the air chisel it would have been way longer. The air chisel made the job easy. You will get dirty and make sure to use a really good face mask. I'm 48 and I've got sore muscles today, but not too bad. I used the chisel to break the mortar and leverage the bricks apart, then removed the bricks and chimney liner piece by piece. It was basically just a few seconds of breaking the mortar and then remove the pieces. I have about 200 or so bricks now and a bunch of the liners. I'll end up reusing all the materials somewhere around the yard. I worked my way down from the top. When I got thru the attic and half way down the first floor I had to open the wall. I put up plastic to the front door on the walls and cardboard on the floor, sealed it with duct tape and put a couple of high power cooling fans at the end of the "plastic tunnel" by the front door to remove the dust. It worked really well and there was very little dust that got into the house. The basement also didn't get much dust because it was getting sucked out the "plastic tunnel" to the front door. This was an easy job, far easier then I thought it would be. Take your time, disassemble, don't destruct, and make sure to seal off the rest of the house and your job will be just as easy. Good Luck!

 
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09-23-09, 09:52 AM   #16 (permalink)  
Taking Out A Chimney

Hello All,
I have to take our chimney out and wanted help from anyone experienced at doing this. What would be the easiest way? And can this be done if you have a propane furnace??

 
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