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New Burner Motor? Which one?


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04-01-17, 07:39 AM   #1 (permalink)  
New Burner Motor? Which one?

I think I have a burner motor going bad. It's a 30 year old Wayne MSR on a warm air furnace. Every once in a while, it will go into lockout, and the reason seems to be the circuit breaker on the burner motor has tripped. Reset it and it runs fine. Everything else seems good. I replaced the filter screen thinking maybe it was dirty and overloading the motor. This has happened maybe 3 times in the last year, but it happened twice yesterday, so I'm thinking maybe I should replace the motor.

It seems like a very easy job. Anything special I should know? And which motor to use? Are they pretty generic? Below is the burner and the plate on the motor.

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04-01-17, 05:15 PM   #2 (permalink)  
This one should work for you. EL2002 - Century EL2002 - 5-5/8" Oil Burner Motor w/ Reversible Rotation (115V, 3450 RPM, 1/7 HP)
The capacitor start motors will not fit because the capacitor will hit the junction box.

Before replacing the motor, check the pump to make sure it turns freely.


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04-01-17, 06:22 PM   #3 (permalink)  
Thanks Grady. What's the easiest way to check the pump? Just remove the cover and spin it? I'd feel a lot of drag from the motor and the fan, I would think?


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04-02-17, 05:14 AM   #4 (permalink)  
The best way I've found is to remove the motor, leaving the plastic coupling attached to the pump, & turn the pump with the coupling. The pump should turn smoothly without grabbing in spots.


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04-02-17, 06:13 AM   #5 (permalink)  
Thanks again Grady. I like that much better, and no spilling oil.

Removing the motor is as siimple as disconnecting the wires, undoing the bolts and pulling it out? No surprises there? Just as easy to reinstall?

 
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04-03-17, 04:43 AM   #6 (permalink)  
Just make sure the power is turned off before touching any wires. If you elect to use the motor in the link, be aware the rotation is reversible. Be sure to verify correct rotation before installing. You will have to swap the burner fan from the old motor to the new. The only tool you should need is a 5/32(?) allen wrench. Keep the spacing between the fan & motor the same as the old.


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04-04-17, 05:52 AM   #7 (permalink)  
Thanks Grady. I ordered a motor, and will tackle it next week, when it looks like we won't be needing heat, just in case.

 
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04-15-17, 12:00 PM   #8 (permalink)  
Update: Motor is in and working fine. For anyone else attempting this for the first time, I found it was easiest to put the plastic coupling on the oil pump, then fit the motor into it.

Thanks again Grady.

 
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04-19-17, 07:00 AM   #9 (permalink)  
Glad all went well & that I was able to help in some small way.


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