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Converting a 2 story shed into a livable house. Need an estimate.


msafine's Avatar
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05-09-17, 03:54 PM   #1 (permalink)  
Converting a 2 story shed into a livable house. Need an estimate.

Hello,
can someone give a rough estimate, please, how much it might cost to convert this 2 story home depot shed into a livable house? This is the shed:
Home Depot Tiny Houses - Tiny House Listings
They say that it can be up to 720 sq. f.

I've seen people are doing that. Like it's here:
https://www.fmrealty.com/real-estate...Photo=exterior

1. With city water and sewage.
2. Without(needs septic and well).

I live in Raleigh, NC area. I would be glad to find a contractor as well, who can do that.


Last edited by msafine; 05-09-17 at 05:27 PM.
 
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chandler's Avatar
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05-09-17, 04:32 PM   #2 (permalink)  
Impossible for us to do estimates based on different locations. You'll have to find a contractor on your own as we don't recommend services on the forum.

Basically it can be done. Pull permits, have it sat on a permanent foundation with proper footer, have your POCO set a meter and run your primary wiring, run all your circuits, do whatever plumbing you need, insulate the walls and floor.

 
msafine's Avatar
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05-09-17, 05:32 PM   #3 (permalink)  
How much it can be in GA? Any state will be ok.
I tried to contact a few contractors, it looks like they are not interested(not getting responses), probably because it's not too much work for them. I don't know.
I wonder, if there is a site, where I can just post this information, what I am looking for and be reviewed by many of them.
I tried to "Find a Professional" at this site and no one responded.

 
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05-09-17, 06:29 PM   #4 (permalink)  
Looking for a contractor to pick up where that building stopped is probably going to be more expensive than just asking for a price to build a little house. Search for a contractor who is building tiny homes. There would be many advantages of having one contractor build it all from scratch.

Now, starting with the building in that link ignores required building codes for livable spaces. Heat, electric, plumbing all have to be added along with a foundation, landscaping and as you mentioned septic and well if needed.

Do you already own some land?

Bud

 
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05-10-17, 03:37 AM   #5 (permalink)  
OK, to scratch an itch.............if I were doing it the cost would be about 5 times the cost of the shed itself. It is really a lot of work that has to be done post construction. If you do things like electrical and plumbing as the structure is being built, it is much easier.

The site you refer us to, actually refers you to tiny home builders so it may be a good place to start.

 
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05-10-17, 03:50 PM   #6 (permalink)  
>Do you already own some land?
No, I don't. It's not worth buying a land, unless I know what I am going to do with it.

 
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05-10-17, 04:27 PM   #7 (permalink)  
You might want to start with an architect. There are usually free referral services and the architect shouldn't cost much just for a general idea.

I would think you need a proper foundation as mentioned whether you're building a house or a tiny house.
Once you determine the price of the foundation you could decide if you want to make it larger.
A larger foundation and more expense on materials might be worth it to you.

Either way, look at the hold-downs. You don't want the building sliding off the foundation or blowing away

Here's just one example, there are other types:

Name:  holddown.JPG
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Brian

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05-10-17, 04:30 PM   #8 (permalink)  
I realize the tiny home are buzzing all over the news but often they often involve a lot of owner labor, basically a DIY project and that can be done. But the hammer and nail work is only part of the cost.

One approach I have seen is to find a location where an older mobile home can be set up and a well and septic installed. In some places there are older homes that need a ton of work so are sold at a very low price. But they may already have a well and septic. If the house cannot be used it could be salvaged for materials. if at all functional it might serve as a roof over your head while you build your tiny home.

You said " Any state will be ok." does that mean you will consider any state? If so, there are lots of areas that have vacant homes that you might be able to get started in. Watched a show recently where the town was all but abandoned except for a couple of diehards who insisted upon staying. But there were many empty homes that no one wanted.

Bud

 
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05-11-17, 03:11 AM   #9 (permalink)  
Also before you buy a lot you need to be sure what you want to construct [including septic system or well] will be permitted for that lot.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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05-11-17, 04:09 AM   #10 (permalink)  
Posted By: msafine ". . . It's not worth buying a land, unless I know what I am going to do with it . . ."
It sounds like the Proverbial Catch 22 . . . . you won't get a solid quote until you know the location and cost/climate constraints; and you can't buy the land until you know what you can afford to do with it.

When in doubt, doing nothing will allow time to make the big decisions for you.

 
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05-11-17, 04:35 AM   #11 (permalink)  
Tiny homes in the news.
I noticed in the pictures in the following links that the homes looked like they were set on blocks and the first link is on the coast of Maine, and they would get cold. From that link they mention another cluster project and show a video which could give you an idea as to how easily they go together. Of course these examples are community projects so they have the land and have taken care of the related permits, but a bit interesting.

In college I talked my way into getting the only single occupancy dorm room, a 5' x 10' room with a window and a door. I loved it, the privacy allowed me to think which is rare with Dorm life.

Bud
Tiny houses could solve midcoast Maine’s shelter shortage — Homestead — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

Dream Center of Pickens County | Hope. Love. Restoration.

 
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