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Battery tester say battery double charged?


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08-19-17, 05:02 PM   #1 (permalink)  
Battery tester say battery double charged?

Took my truck to the parts store for another reason and upon testing the health of the battery, was told the battery was double charged/had twice the amount of charge and that that was bad for the battery.

Any ideas how this could happen and what problems this could result in?

 
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08-19-17, 05:43 PM   #2 (permalink)  
I never heard of double charged. The closest that I've come to that is when I went to jump a car & it wasn't enough to start it. At that point, I would remove the positive cable, leave the positive jumper cable connected to it & connect the negative jumper to the positive terminal. That allows you to jump the car with 24 volts.

 
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08-19-17, 05:51 PM   #3 (permalink)  
I know how it could happen. They have a quota on batteries this month. Double charged is nonsense talk. You can get a basic idea of your charging system with a simple voltmeter. Check battery with engine off. Ideally it would be just about 12.5VDC. You'll have some drain due to all the things that need constant juice. You'll probably read more like 11.9-12.3 VDC. Still good, but if it's on the low side may want to do some maintenance (clean connections, tighten grounds, check water level, etc). With engine running it should read about 14-14.5 VDC.

Did they even explain what a double charge meant?


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08-19-17, 05:59 PM   #4 (permalink)  
I agree w/ gunguy. It sound like a lot of crap.

 
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08-20-17, 04:10 AM   #5 (permalink)  
I too agree.
They will be likely reading battery voltage and the highest reading you can get on any six cell lead acid battery would be about 14.2 volts DC.
This would only be a surface charge and would soon drop to about 13.8 volts which would indicate a full charge.
Or maybe the tester was set to 6 volts.

It is likely that the person who told you this has not yet been trained.


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08-20-17, 04:41 AM   #6 (permalink)  
Add me to those that have never heard of a double charge. Checking the voltage along with a load test [to see if the volts drop] is the most common way to test a battery. What was the other issue? why did it progress to testing the battery?


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08-20-17, 05:05 AM   #7 (permalink)  
There is such a thing as your alternator over charging, but that's not the battery at fault. All crap.

 
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08-20-17, 06:13 AM   #8 (permalink)  
Now that I think about it, I had a battery that was overcharging & it blew up when I was driving.

 
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08-20-17, 06:29 AM   #9 (permalink)  
Sometimes the first sign of a battery overcharging is having to add water/electrolyte.
I only had a battery blow once. I was jump starting a 6 volt with a 12. When the battery exploded I thought someone had fired a shotgun .... until my arm started itching and the sleeve fell off.


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08-20-17, 07:37 AM   #10 (permalink)  
A few years back, voltage regulators were mechanical devices with points, and those points consisted of copper arms with contacts on the end of them, similar to what you see in pressure switches for air compressors and well pumps today. It seems that Chrysler ones were possibly the worst, but any of them would stick together occasionally, and it was not too uncommon to see the voltmeter start to climb, so you would pull over to the side of the road, rap on the voltage regulator, and be on your merry way. Of course times were different, and people did pay attention to such things, but, if you didn't, the voltage would keep climbing, and it was not uncommon to see batteries that had exploded. Technology has changed since then, including batteries, but I think that if you tried to overcharge a battery to the degree you described it is still going to explode. So I'm in the same camp as others, thinking that what you were told is bs. The guy didn't know what he was doing, didn't have it set right, they had a quota to hit on batteries, or whatever, but I would have it checked someplace else.

 
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08-22-17, 09:21 AM   #11 (permalink)  
I'll try and figure out how to use my multimeter to check the voltage, if I can't figure it out I'll just buy a voltmeter, thanks

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08-22-17, 10:37 AM   #12 (permalink)  
A multimeter is a volt meter as is shown in your pic. If you measure volts it will most likely say 12 volts, but will not tell you if it has enough charge. For that you need to put a load on it. Pep-Boys or a dealer can do that for you. Usually free of charge.

 
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08-22-17, 12:28 PM   #13 (permalink)  
gotcha, ok I'll take it to Pep Boys, thanks

 
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08-23-17, 06:40 PM   #14 (permalink)  
I used this volt gauge to test both with the car off and the car on.
Each time the backlight on the gauge lights up but no reading

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08-23-17, 06:51 PM   #15 (permalink)  
I used this volt gauge to test both with the car off and the car on.
Each time the backlight on the gauge lights up but no reading

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08-23-17, 07:30 PM   #16 (permalink)  
Did you have the polarity correct? And why a panel mount voltmeter? Still in the package? Planning to return it after using it?

You have a multimeter that will read volts. Plug the probes in, turn it to DCV 20 and read what it says. If it has a minus sign, you have the polarity reversed. You still need to have the battery load checked, voltage is just an indicator.


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08-23-17, 08:45 PM   #17 (permalink)  
I tried the leads both ways, same result.
I left the packaging intact so I could return it if it didn't do the job as needed.
The multimeter, as I understand, if I set it to 12 and it's >=12 will read yes, not the actual number. If I set it to 20 and it's, say 16 it'll read no, again not the actual number.
All I want is to touch two probes and read the actual voltage but haven't been able to find such an animal.

 
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08-23-17, 09:40 PM   #18 (permalink)  
I don't know wth you mean saying it will read yes or no.

Well, you don't have a 12V setting on the multimeter. Whatever it is set to (in the DCV scale) is the MAX it will read. So 20 will read up to 20VDC. Setting it below that will probably give and error or overload on the display, but it won't hurt the meter. There is no 12V setting on the one you showed. Looks like 200mV, 2000mV (same as 2V), 20V, 200V and 1000V? If it's not an auto ranging meter, I was taught to start at the highest scale, then go down til you get a mid-range reading on whatever scale you have available. It will give the most accurate measurement that way. So 12-14 is near the middle of 0-20. Most will just read less fractions of a volt on higher scales, so instead of 13.25 (for instance) setting it to the 200 or 1000 scale might give a reading of just 13.

This is really basic stuff. Why do you have a multimeter but don't know how to measure voltage with it?

Manual in case you don't have yours. https://www.manualslib.com/manual/81...?page=5#manual


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08-24-17, 03:45 AM   #19 (permalink)  
What you are using is a panel mount gauge (http://www.iequus.com/). NOT A VOM (volt, ohm meter). Get a vom meter. Harbor freight gives them away for free (just buy something). Then learn how to use it. Look at what Vic posted.

 
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08-24-17, 06:21 PM   #20 (permalink)  
When you connect the panel mount gauge and it lights up it means that you have used the connection that would be connected to the vehicle's dash lights.
If you open the package the connections may become obvious.

I use a gauge just like that mounted in my boat to keep track of my auxiliary battery.


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08-24-17, 11:19 PM   #21 (permalink)  
Just a note.Depending on the vehicle you have you , or the person that tested your battery, may get a higher then normal voltage. Then with inexperience do not know how to decipher the results.

Normal alternators control the voltage and charge rate. Normally you dont see over 14.4 volts.

But on some cares/truck, especially my Chevy pick up the ECM controls the charge current and voltages.

Particularly on my truck its a 3 stage type ECM controlled charging algorithm. I see voltages as high as 16 volts when the ECM goes into sulfation mode. This may be what the tech that tested your battery saw.

Also for fuel savings I see the ECM kick the voltage up and down while driving. Sometimes as low as 13 volts where it completely shuts down charging for a brief moment.

I can kick it out of that mode just by running a load... ie: lights, A/C etc. Also putting it in tow haul mode will put it back to a charging state.


This is a good system.

I just changed out the original battery on this truck..

Wait for it....... It was 11 years old..

Do you own one of the vehicles listed in this pdf?

Other car makers may be doing it now...

https://acdelcotechconnect.com/pdf/imtn_V12I305.pdf


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08-25-17, 05:48 AM   #22 (permalink)  
Since your battery was not the reason you went to the parts store, I would ignore the comments of the person testing the battery and get the original issue corrected. If you want to pursue the “overcharged battery issue” after the original issue is corrected I suggest the following. First: learn how to measure DC voltage on your multimeter and how to use to select the best range for 12 vdc. Second : start the vehicle and turn all loads (radio, A/C, lights, etc). If the dc voltage measured at the battery terminals is 12-14 dc, you don’t have a battery/charging issue at this time.

 
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08-25-17, 06:58 AM   #23 (permalink)  
My vehicle was not listed in the PDF.
It's a 2004 Dodge Ram 1500 ST 3.7l V6 RWD Manual.
The battery gauge in the instrument cluster reads a full charge but not over.

As I'm sorting through all this info and learning how to use this multimeter, the same thing happened this AM:

Turned the key and heard a fast popping/deflating sound, very similar to blowing one of those old school round home fuses.

Starter wouldn't engage, no lights on the dash.

Opened the door, the door-open light came on.

Still no light on the dash when I put the key in and tried to start. Again the starter wouldn't engage but this time no fuse-blowing sound.

I disconnected the negative terminal on the battery and left it off for a minute or so.

Reconnected the negative terminal and it fired right up as nothing ever happened.

 
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08-25-17, 12:39 PM   #24 (permalink)  
Your probably in the wrong forums.. You should be in a dodge specific site..

I looked it up and it seems its a common problem.

Seems to gravitate to the ignition switch.. where you put the key..

Or a corroded wire to starter or ground.

Last possible a starter issue..


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08-25-17, 12:49 PM   #25 (permalink)  
Whatch this video.. Very interesting... Have a look at the wire harness to pcm..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jiBM13cQd8


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08-25-17, 12:51 PM   #26 (permalink)  
Test. Trying to post vid so shows as full screen vid..

Edit. It does not work. Will report issue to admin....

https://youtu.be/-jiBM13cQd8


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08-25-17, 06:04 PM   #27 (permalink)  
I used this multimeter.
I set it to DCV 20.
Put the probes onto the battery and it registered 12.# on the screen.
I think the battery is fine.
I looked at the video but I'm not yet convinced that this is my issue since the symptoms aren't the same.
Now that I'm at ease that the battery isn't going to explode, when it happens again I'll disconnect the battery, leave it off for a couple minutes, then reconnect. Once that becomes an established pattern I'll investigate further based on that.

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08-25-17, 06:40 PM   #28 (permalink)  
Turned the key and heard a fast popping/deflating sound, very similar to blowing one of those old school round home fuses.

Starter wouldn't engage, no lights on the dash.

Opened the door, the door-open light came on.

Still no light on the dash when I put the key in and tried to start. Again the starter wouldn't engage but this time no fuse-blowing sound.
Sounds like intermitten starting issues to me...


You need to be more specific or we cant help.... Your posts on your symptoms are confusing to say the least..

After reading I question whats really going on....


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08-25-17, 07:54 PM   #29 (permalink)  
sorry about that, let me get to the point where I can reproduce the issue using exact steps and I'll repost

 
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08-27-17, 10:30 PM   #30 (permalink)  
It's looking like user error at this point.
Not sure why but with my other cars I always turn on the car, wait a couple seconds until the fuel line humm subsides, then engage the starter.
So far everything's been fine when doing this on the truck.

 
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08-29-17, 05:00 AM   #31 (permalink)  
Now it doesn't look like user error, it didn't start again yesterday afternoon.

However, whenever I disconnect the negative terminal and leave it off for a couple minutes then reconnect it, she fires right up.

As I reflect on the situation, it seems this happens whenever I don't start the car for several hours while the battery has remained connected:

May 2017 - Mid-August 2017:
I would drive the truck once per week on average but each time would disconnect the negative terminal. No starting problems upon reconnection for the next drive.

Mid-August - Present:
I'm driving the truck more frequently so I leave the battery connected.
Upon first startup 'du jour' I'll hear only that first "bite" from the starter but the electrical (as indicated by a blank gauge cluster) goes dead after that.
If I disconnect the negative terminal and leave it off for a couple minutes then reconnect it, she fires right up.
During the day of driving, shutting off, restarting, etc. there's no starting problems.

I can reproduce the issue now.
Basically I leave the battery connected overnight (or any long period of time),
the next morning attempt to start it,
it won't start,
I disconnect the negative terminal,
leave it disconnected for a couple minutes,
reconnect the negative terminal,
truck starts.

Any ideas on what this could be?

 
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08-29-17, 06:32 PM   #32 (permalink)  
Sounds like the ignition switch is not providing the same voltage to the electronic control module in the OFF position as when the battery negative terminal is disconnected. If there is no OBD code for this, then diagnostic service at a Dodge dealer is your best bet.

 
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08-31-17, 05:20 AM   #33 (permalink)  
I plugged in a code reader, no codes, I guess I'll take it to the stealership

 
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09-11-17, 04:37 AM   #34 (permalink)  
Since the starter starts to engage then all electricity goes off isn't something getting tripped somewhere? I figure it would be a blown fuse but since the disconnect/reconnect (used to) get it to start again, it can't be a fuse, a relay perhaps?

 
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09-11-17, 01:08 PM   #35 (permalink)  
My guess is that you have a poor connection somewhere. It could be corroded battery terminals or any of the bolted connections between the battery positive pole to the starting relay to the starter itself OR from the negative battery terminal to the connection that wire makes on the engine. Remove each terminal and use a wire brush or sandpaper to clean each connection to shiny metal.

If that doesn't work then you will need a voltmeter for further troubleshooting.

 
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09-11-17, 03:17 PM   #36 (permalink)  
Yes Joel as I posted here its common with these trucks.. But one has to troubleshoot or pay the man to do it.. Me? I dont pay the man!!!! LOL..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jiB...ature=youtu.be


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09-13-17, 06:15 AM   #37 (permalink)  
A mechanic friend of mine said it's likely a battery cable issue and to first disconnect the negative and use a jumper to connect the negative terminal to the chassis and see if it starts.
If it starts properly then it's (fortunately the negative battery cable)

I tried it and got no power at all.

Upon inspection of the cable itself it's not a standard single cable, it's three cables.

Is it possible to perform the recommended test given this configuration or is the only way to perform this test is buy a new negative battery cable?

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09-13-17, 06:57 AM   #38 (permalink)  
Are you sure you're looking at the negative cable and not the positive? any sparks when you hooked up the jumper?


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09-13-17, 07:43 AM   #39 (permalink)  
I'm 100% sure that is the negative cable (3 cables coming into one)

 
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09-13-17, 08:31 AM   #40 (permalink)  
Must be extra grounds because of so much plastic on today's vehicles. Try leaving it connected and a jump cable - if that is the issue the jump cable should work.


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