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How To Store Potatoes


czizzi's Avatar
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03-07-17, 12:44 AM   #1 (permalink)  
How To Store Potatoes

I go to the store and there is always a nice selection of bagged potatoes. I try to choose a bag that contains a couple of bigger spud for baking but other than that just grab a bag. Now these little delightful critters are available year round. I know there must be a "growing season" but none the less, you can purchase them year round.

I get them home, store them in a wooden box (old fashioned style) and immediately they start sprouting at the eyes. So, What is the secret to storing spuds? It really has eluded me.

 
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03-07-17, 03:01 AM   #2 (permalink)  
They called 'em root cellars for a reason. Cool, dark, constant humidity. If you don't have a basement, then a closet is good. Last resort, a bottom cabinet.

I never put them in a box. Either leave in the mesh bag (not plastic) or single layer on a piece of cardboard or a cardboard box top like from a case of paper.

Eyes don't bother me, that's what the pointy end of the peeler is for...or a good paring knife. Ex- on the other hand says if it's sprouting eyes more than 1/4" it's going bad.

Another hint If you have a bunch of onions that may only be around for a limited time (vidalias for me) put them in a pair of womens hose tying a knot between each one. Need an onion? Cut the last one below the knot and work your way up. Storage is the same as potatoes. Cool and dark as possible.


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03-07-17, 03:13 AM   #3 (permalink)  
We have one of those wooden tater bins in the kitchen. Some bags of potatoes will sprout but others won't Never thought of it as a big deal since it gets trimmed off anyway.

My wife likes to peel/cut onions and put them in the freezer, works surprisingly well. Neither one of us can handle eating raw onions so they always get cooked .... not sure how well freezing would work if you want a raw slice.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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03-07-17, 03:55 AM   #4 (permalink)  
Tried cool and dark in the pantry, no good. Bought a tator box like mark mentioned at an estate sale, They last longer, but the same end. Eyes start sprouting after a while. Just wondering what the market does to keep them longer that what I do. Doesn't seem to be a sell by date on them.

 
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03-07-17, 04:02 AM   #5 (permalink)  
The turn over in the store is much faster than you may think. That's why you don't see eye in the store bags.

 
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03-07-17, 04:04 AM   #6 (permalink)  
Thanks Norm, but the supply chain is longer than the local market. What keeps them from sprouting from field to market before they get to me?

 
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03-07-17, 04:18 AM   #7 (permalink)  
It's probably just a matter of time. I've noticed some bags will start sprouting within a week of purchase while the next bag might not sprout at all. ..... maybe you just need to eat more taters


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03-07-17, 04:57 AM   #8 (permalink)  
Some potatoes are chemically treated to inhibit sprouting, some are not. That probably explains why one bag will and next won't.

Wife plants potatoes in the garden each year. We just leave them in the ground as long as possible and they keep well as long as it's not wet. Moisture is an enemy...it will speed up both rot and sprouting. When they finally have to all be dug, we chunk them up, par boil them, and then freeze them. Freezing alters their texture, but they are still good for frying or soups/stews.


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