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Blueboard vs Drywall


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08-15-00, 07:51 PM   #1 (permalink)  
Hi,
I saw recently on tv where blueboard was used in a living area - it was mentioned that it was quicker and much less fuss than drywall. As my husband just ripped down the plaster and lathe walls of my daughters room, we'd like to know if we should consider blueboard as a means of getting her back in her bedroom faster.
Thanks!

 
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08-16-00, 08:09 AM   #2 (permalink)  
Having hung both types of sheetrock I will tell you there is little or no difference in the hanging time.If anything the waterproof rock is more brittle.The content of the drywall is treated completely to resist water.I have always thought the color was to identify more so than anything.

 
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08-17-00, 01:47 AM   #3 (permalink)  
Hi Amanda. Contrary to some of the comments I've read on this forum, blueboard and greenboard are NOT the same. Blueboard is used for veneer plastering, and the surface paper has special absorbtion qualities. It is definitely NOT water resistant like greenboard (except AFTER plastering, of course), and it is not supposed to be painted like regular drywall (except, again, AFTER plastering).

To address your question regarding blueboard vs drywall, completing a regular drywall installation (using joint compound) does take longer than completing a blueboard installation (using veneer plaster). There are less steps involved in veneer plastering, and a bedroom could be easily completed by a professional in one day. BUT, plastering walls is somewhat of a finer art form than joint compounding walls. I've hung blueboard for both professional plasterers and do-it-yourself plasterers, and I've seen the end results -- the work of those who are skilled in the plastering trade is far superior to the d-i-y'ers. And due to the fast-setting nature of veneer plaster, the application must move along fairly rapidly -- too rapidly, in my opinion, for a do-it-yourselfer.

In contrast, completing regular drywall with joint compound to a near (or better) than professional finish can be accomplished by a do-it-yourselfer, given time and patience -- a bedroom might take 4 days (or more) to finish.

Joint compound (for regular drywall) is far more forgiving than plaster. Joint compound can be bought pre-mixed, has a generous working time, can be remoistened and reworked, can be easily sanded after dry, and all tools can be easily cleaned up afterwards with water.

Veneer plaster must be mixed with water, has a relatively short working time (about 30 minutes, after which it cannot be reworked), cannot be removed without damaging the face paper of the blueboard (it bonds to the paper), cannot be easily sanded, and all containers and tools must be immaculately cleaned before the plaster sets up. But veneer plaster has some definite advantages over regular drywall -- it is abuse-resistant and moisture-resistant.

If you and your husband decide to use blueboard and veneer plaster to replaster your daughter's room, take a look at http://www.nationalgypsum.com/html/gcg-sections.html and download http://www.nationalgypsum.com/assets/16-2171.pdf for more information on blueboard and on how to apply veneer plaster. Or, see http://www.usgaction.com/handbook/chap1/chp1toc.htm and select Veneer Plaster Gypsum Base Products at http://www.usgaction.com/handbook/chap1/VNR_PLST.html or Veneer Plaster Finishes at http://www.usgaction.com/handbook/chap1/VP_FNSH.html. Or see http://www.usgaction.com/handbook/chap4/chp4toc.htm and select any of the Veneer Plaster finish topics. Regular drywall finishing is also covered (see Joint Treatment for Drywall Construction at http://www.usgaction.com/handbook/chap4/JOINTTRT.html).

Both National Gypsum (www.nationalgypsum.com) and United States Gypsum (www.usg.com or www.usgaction.com) have drywall information available online for both do-it-yourselfers and professionals.

 
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08-17-00, 03:48 AM   #4 (permalink)  
Amanda:
Mike is absolutely correct. I as a general contractor and builder and someone who does alot of each each week, have sometimes cut corners in answers because of of time in putting up a particular product. On my jobs I only put blueboard and greenboard in areas of dampness such as bathrooms and laundry rooms. On all else I use sheetrock or drywall as you call it. One reason is that sheetrock is cheaper. But with sheetrock you also have to tape and texture. I also tape and texture all my greenboard and blue board also. This is one reason all my jobs have a professional appearance and never any problems. Blue board is heavier to handle, but no time savings if you are going to tape and texture. You can do what you like but I would sheetrock, using 1/2" horizonal to the walls, starting with the floor and going up.
Some will say start at the top and come down, but if you are not used to hanging it,
it get wear you out very quickly. You can apply ceiling trim to cover the top line. Also use corner trim for sheetrock before finishing, and do not forget to apply first kote. Good Luck

 
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08-17-00, 06:01 PM   #5 (permalink)  
Gentleman,
This is more information than I ever hoped for. I am extremely grateful for you all taking the time to answer my inquiry so detailed.

This gives me much to think about. With your help, my daughter's room will look great! Then we can move on to my son's room, my room, the hallway, the bathroom.....

Thank you all VERY much!!

Amanda

 
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02-17-08, 08:15 AM   #6 (permalink)  
Considering veneer plaster

I was doing some searches and found this old thread on veneer plaster. As I have read elsewhere, it sounds like veneer plastering is somewhat of an art. Thus, is it a worthless cause for a DIY to attempt veneer plastering, only to wind up with a horrible result at the end of a job?

I haven't found any resources that explain the technique involved with veneer plastering, and the links referenced in this post are unfortunately expired. Does anyone have any suggestions for where to look?

Posted By: ;38669 BUT, plastering walls is somewhat of a finer art form than joint compounding walls. I've hung blueboard for both professional plasterers and do-it-yourself plasterers, and I've seen the end results -- the work of those who are skilled in the plastering trade is far superior to the d-i-y'ers. And due to the fast-setting nature of veneer plaster, the application must move along fairly rapidly -- too rapidly, in my opinion, for a do-it-yourselfer.

 
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02-17-08, 10:11 AM   #7 (permalink)  
Welcome to the forums rmcfall

IMO a veneer plaster is beyond the ability of most diyers. There are a couple of plaster pros that frequent the forums - hopefully one of them will chime in with some better info for you.


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02-18-08, 06:27 PM   #8 (permalink)  
My condo was built in the 50's, it has plaster walls. I was told it is blueboard because I could see (from looking in the attic or holes that I cut into the walls) that there are 16" by 48" strips of light blue drywall. Covering that is a thick layer of concrete, then a thin layer of plaster. I went thru 2 keyhole saws and one expensive 4 1/8" hole saw before I realized that it was actually concrete.

What's the deal with that? Why put up concrete before the plaster?

 
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02-19-08, 03:55 AM   #9 (permalink)  
You don't have blue board, it's a gypsum lath. Todays blue board comes in full sheets just like drywall.

No concrete either that hard concrete like stuff is the brown or base coat. That's the way plaster was done back then. Today's blue board takes the place of the old lath - both gypsum and wood and the brown coat.


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02-22-08, 03:17 PM   #10 (permalink)  
Thanks for the reply. Since you said "most diyers" I am of course still thinking I have a chance at it. Perhaps I am a fool though for even considering this...

Posted By: marksr Welcome to the forums rmcfall

IMO a veneer plaster is beyond the ability of most diyers. There are a couple of plaster pros that frequent the forums - hopefully one of them will chime in with some better info for you.

 
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03-10-08, 08:10 PM   #11 (permalink)  
im no pro

but have used veneer plaster for the past 15 years or so with nothing but sucess, it is quick, have to clean your tools up promptly (im not spotless by any means) and dont be affraid to experiment. im a bodyman by trade, have used plastic filler applicators as well as the proper floats and finishing trowels, have made designs and sculptures in walls, just did an attic in a house i just moved into. would post pics but dont see how to do so. just completed it this weekend. im not good with tape and mud, but plaster is a breeze . ohh,,,, and when you start its best to dedicate - or commit - your time to completing at least one wall with no interuptions. have a bucket of water handy along with a scrubbing brush for tools, wear a hat if doing the ceiling, and wear disposible gloves to keep your skin from drying out (i dont usually - but should!)

 
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03-10-08, 08:30 PM   #12 (permalink)  
That's interesting Donnydog, because I've found "just" drywalling an art somewhat beyond my own finesse. To get it done in reasonable time, I mean. And I rate myself pretty competent. So, you say plaster's easier than drywall..? I must try this.

 
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03-11-08, 03:52 AM   #13 (permalink)  
Donnydog,

You can upload your pictures to a host site like Picasa or photobucket and then post the link here. We'd love to see your photos.

 
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