Split Type - Compressor Fan Outside won't turn on.

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  #1  
Old 05-22-06, 04:03 PM
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Split Type - Compressor Fan Outside won't turn on.

Well, it finally happened.

I've kept up with the maintenance and follow everything. I was quiet sure it'll still break.

Anyway, the inside unit works fine. The outside unit, compressor is turning on but the Fan won't turn on.

I checked the contactor and there's voltage to it. The 24vac is also there as the Tstat turns everything on along with the compressor without any issues. The fan on the other hand won't. I turned off the compressor as soon as I got my voltage readings and i heard a hissing sound like air pressure coming out at the bottom as soon as the compressor shuts off. Hopefully no hose broke yet. THe small board in the control panel is also indicating normal condition (LED lights). I also tested the blades and they rotate freely, I can even blow on it and it will spin. It sounds like the fan motor is turning on but I can't really tell since I don't know what the compressor sounds like when its on by itself.

Anyway, problem just started today. The capacitor doesn't look damaged but that doesnt mean anything. It is also the dual capacitor type with 3 terminals.

Any help would be greatly appreciated
 
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  #2  
Old 05-22-06, 04:13 PM
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the compresser will sound like the air compresser at the gas station the fan motor may be bad if you know electronics try a differnt speed.
 
  #3  
Old 05-22-06, 04:26 PM
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Yes I am familiar with electronic parts and such. I had to do a quick read through of how the HVAC system works just a few hours ago.

Anyway, the noise i hear sounds like the fan motor turning on. It sounds like a transformer with tons of voltage but not doing its job to move the fan.... remember those magnetic noise? make sense? lol
 
  #4  
Old 05-22-06, 05:14 PM
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No condenser fan

Energize the unit & using a small stick, give the fan blades a spin. If the fan takes off & runs, you have a bad capacitor.
 
  #5  
Old 05-22-06, 05:16 PM
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I also tested the blades and they rotate freely, I can even blow on it and it will spin. It sounds like the fan motor is turning on but I can't really tell since I don't know what the compressor sounds like when its on by itself.
This part does not make sense. You can see if the fan is turning or not. If it is not then the motor is not turning on.

Set the thermostat so that the A/C should be on. Go outside. You should be able to see that the fan is not turning. Take a screwdriver and give it a shove in the right direction and see if it starts. If it does then replace the capacitor. If it does not then you either have a bad connection on the contactor or the fan motor is actually bad.

The hissing you hear is either the freon equalizing or actually being purged from a relief valve. As long as it has not been doing that all day and night then the damage is probably minimal. Deal with it after the fan starts working.

Report back with the fan results and we can go from there...
 
  #6  
Old 05-23-06, 08:15 AM
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I tried to isolate the 2 parts.

After disconnecting the fan motor, the compressor wasn't the part making the noise. Reconnected the fan motor and there's this annoying slightly buzzing sound - It was the fan motor. It wasn't seized as the fan blade was turning freely, so safe to assume the motor is just bad.

I'm going to the hvac shop to get a replacement... the hvac shop said that they can also test the capacitor so i'm taking that with me. Will post the results later.
 
  #7  
Old 08-05-07, 07:06 PM
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bad capacitor??

Hi, just wondering what you found out about your condensor fan? Mine is doing the same right now and I'm thinking it's just a bad capacitor, but am wondering if that is something I should attempt to 'do-it-myself' or call on a professional. I did what those other guys recommended and that is turn on the AC where the fan should be spinning, took a screwdriver to give it a shove, and off it went. But now although air now comes out of the vents, it is not the cold air we normally feel, soooo, now I'm not sure if that's the whole problem. Any ideas?
 
  #8  
Old 08-05-07, 08:51 PM
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Wink

riverwade Id say you need a new capacitor then . Was the compressor running when you say no cold air??? Lot of units have a dual capacitor there for the fan and compressor. Might check both sides could be bad .
 
  #9  
Old 08-06-07, 12:09 PM
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Ed, thanks for the response. I just got off the phone with an HVAC tech and he is pretty sure it's a bad dual capacitor as well. He's going to call back later and hopefully come out tonite to replace it. I tried calling around to get the part but think I'll just pay someone to fix this for me. I figure it will take this guy 15 minutes so hopefully he won't kill me too much with the price. Thank you again. I haven't been on this website in forever but I remember you helping me a long time ago in the selection and installation of a whole house humidifier. That I was able to do myself and it makes all the difference in the world in the winter. Take good care.

Wayne Parks
 
  #10  
Old 08-07-07, 05:02 AM
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Smile I did it myself!

Just to update, I called a friend of a friend who is an HVAC guy and he did confirm it was a dual capacitor that went bad and said he had one on his truck but couldn't come out to install it last evening because he was at his son's football practice, so I drove up there, gave him 40 bucks and he gave me the part and I went and installed it myself. Couldn't have been easier. I was just very careful to disconnect the power obviously. When I opened it up, I discovered my capacitor had blow it's top with that nasty gook oozing out. I took a picture but I guess I can't post it on this site. Anyway, I'm so grateful there are websites like this. This is what makes the internet so awesome. Thanks again Ed!!

Wayne
 
  #11  
Old 08-07-07, 06:33 PM
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Picture

You can post your picture on photobucket.com or other photo sharing site & provide us with the URL to it.
 
  #12  
Old 05-29-08, 11:21 AM
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Hey, thanks for this forum.

My fan motor would not work and I was about to buy a new one to the tune of 100 bucks plus. I did a search and found this thread. I put the motor back in and gave the fan a spin and it spun. (Not as fast as it should, but it showed me it was indeed the condenser) I then spent 25 bucks on a condenser, and about 5 minutes to swap it out, and the AC is again working fine.
 
  #13  
Old 06-01-08, 02:04 AM
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I'm running into the same problem. Although I hear no noises, the outside unit simply isn't turning on. The fan inside works fine. Last year at the initial turn on, it wouldn't work either. A repairman came out and replaced a capacitor. It worked all summer just fine. This year same problem again. I did check for voltages and all are there. The problem I believe, is another capacitor. The trouble I'm having is deciding which one. There seems to be 3 capacitors wire-tied together. Anyone ever heard of this? Is there a way to check which one (or all) may be at fault? Thank you.

Rick
 
  #14  
Old 06-01-08, 04:25 AM
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It is indeed possible that you may have 3 capacitors with the outside unit. One is likely black (this is a starting capacitor, for the compressor), and two others should be silver (these are running capacitors...why two? one for the compressor, the other for the outdoor blower)

The first thing you should make sure is that you are getting 220V at the fuse box next to the outdoor unit.
If so, remove the control box cover door, that will allow you full view of the 3 capacitors and the contactor.

See if the contacts of the contactor are puleld-in (closed) when the t-stat is calling for cooling. If so, the contactor is doing its job. Double check as well that the power side of the contactor is indeed allowing 220V go to the two motors.

Which motor is not running in that outdoor unit?
The compressor? The blower? both?
 
  #15  
Old 06-18-08, 09:45 AM
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Condenser or Contactor or Capacitor?

To: JHONB

Did you mean really mean the condensor? Or was it the capacitor - or maybe the contactor? I'm having the same problem with one of my units and I'm trying to decide what part/s to buy. Johnson Supply won't sell to me 'cause I'm just a lolely housewife with a husband out of town.
 
  #16  
Old 06-18-08, 09:57 AM
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Cool

Capacitors used to be called 'condensors', back when TV's had tubes in them.
Now to avoid confusion with the condensing unit, condensing fan, etc... we call 'em capacitors.
Before fooling around with a capacitor, make sure the power is off, and you discharge the capacitor by using a screwdriver and shorting all terminals of the cap to ground, or you'll get a nasty shock!
Tom
 
  #17  
Old 09-04-08, 05:21 PM
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how do i test the contactor

I am having the same issue. the fan won't turn. I have tested the capacitor and it's fine. I spin the fan and it doesnt spin so im assuming i need to ensure that power is gettng through the contactor.

How exactly do i do that?
 
  #18  
Old 09-04-08, 06:50 PM
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Testing Voltage

You will need a volt meter capable of at least 250 volts AC. Check the voltage coming into the contactor by putting one probe on each terminal where the heavy wire coming from the house connects to the contactor. If you get +/-220 volts, you have power to the contactor. Next check the terminals directly opposite (usually above) the ones you just checked. You should get nearly the same reading. If power is coming in but not going out (with the thermostat calling for cooling) the contactor is likely the culprit.

If the compressor runs but not the fan, you obviously are getting power thru the contactor & can forget the above testing. The problem then probably lies with the motor.
 
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