How to disable temperature sensor on LG window unit


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Old 06-08-08, 10:54 PM
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How to disable temperature sensor on LG window unit

Hello,

I have a 1 year old LG window 10,000 BTU unit that I bought to replace an aging Panasonic 12,000 BTU unit. From the start I noticed that this new unit would quit working after 15 or so minutes and start blowing cold air again after 5 minutes or so; I guessed it was some kind of energy efficient feature on it and didn't pay no mind to it. Today, the temperature in NY nearly reached 100 degrees and this unit kept cutting in and out [blowing the cold air] every 5 minutes.

My question is this, I'm assuming that it has some kind of temperature sensor to tell it that the room is at the desired temperature and tells it to stop, problem is that the room is no where near 60 degrees [temperature setting on the thermostat], how do I go about disabling the sensor for the room temperature and force the unit to just keep blowing cold air 24/7? Any help will be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 06-09-08, 11:54 AM
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Probably a high pressure cutoff switch is kicking the compressor out call it a nonselfdestruct switch, if you bypass it the compressor will self destruct. A good coil cleaning would probably help it more than anything. 100 in new york man that global warming is hitting hard I hope the ice caps do not all melt this afternoon!!!
 
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Old 06-09-08, 03:27 PM
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Thanks for the reply. But I'm pretty sure it is a form of energy saving. It is doing it since I took it out of the box. The box even mentioned it; I just want to disable it, for I see it as a pest right now. There must be some kind of sensor at the front of the unit where it can measure the ambient temperature.

Let me give you a little more background...

The unit is currently installed in the attic. My attic has two rooms and a medium size storage area. the small room next to the storage area was turn into more storage, but the larger room is my computer room, I should really call it my second bedroom because when I stay on late I just crash on the bed I have there. Now, the unit is installed in the only place posible in that room, a window that is preceeded by a kind of "tunnel" like space. Said space gets really cold because on the pressure build up from the heat coming off the roof of the house. Since that small space is cold, the AC unit thinks "Hey, I did my job, let me take a nice break now". Then after it stopped blowing the cold air for the 5 minutes, the space gets warm again and the AC kicks back into action.

Last night wouldn't have been so bad if I didn't have a friend of mine staying in my room for the weekend and me getting stuck in the attic bedroom. But I guess it is one of those things that has to happen because it gives you a purpose. This week we are having our first heat wave and I'm usually in the attic 90% of my free time while at home. I really need to take care of this because the heat there can damage my expensive computer equipment and my large screen LCD.

Once again, any help will be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 06-09-08, 05:23 PM
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I have a 10,000 BTU LG window unit I bought just three weeks ago. It does have an energy saving feature but you have to select it from the remote control.

From what I understand your unit is sitting in the window but the front (inside) is in a "tunnel" and it is most likely not getting the room air recirculated. Since it is only the louvers at the top of the unit that blows the cooled air maybe you can make some kind of diverter that will separate the intake and discharge air in the tunnel. Try something with some heavy cardboard and see if it makes a difference.
 
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Old 06-16-08, 09:43 AM
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Thermostat Sensor

I have a similar problem in my bedroom, which has only a recessed sky light as opposed to any traditional window. This weekend I built a shelf with drainage, lined the recess with plastic sheets and installed a small window unit.

The problem I seem to be having is that the recess cools off very quickly and the air conditioner shuts down the compressor. This sounds like the problem you are also having. So let me tell you what I know and have discovered and perhaps we can help each other out a bit.

There is a thermostat sensor that is very easy to get at. You need to take the face grill off the unit (which should be easy enough, it should just snap on and off. You might need a flat head screw driver). Behind that will be a screen of some sort that you should be able to just pull out ... now behind that will be a metal grill, but somewhere in front of that should be a horizontal wire stretching out from the control box. This wire will seat in a clip and will simply end, somewhere in the middle of the unit. This is your sensor.

The first thing I have tried is running a small plastic pipe from behind the unit (where it should be hot) through the face grill and over the sensor. This has worked reasonably well. The unit still turns off but remains on for longer stretches and the room finally began to cool.

What I am trying to figure out is how that sensor connects to the panel. If those are just two copper wires running to and from the sensor itself, my next plan is to splice an extra four feet or so ... then I could tap the sensor itself to the ceiling in my room and it could do the job it should be doing.

Theory ... if you cut the snsor off, the compressor will just continue to run.

Theory ... You should be able to bypass the actual thermostat (which would be at the othere end of that wire). You would have to get into that control box and see what wires go where. There should be a wire running from the thermostat to the compressor, and probably two other s running into the thermostat from a power source ... one of those will need to be spliced to that first wire (going to the compressor).

Theory ... continaully running the compressor will burn something out.

These are all the ideas I am entertaining. Let me know if you have anything to offer ...
 
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Old 06-16-08, 10:03 AM
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Further exploration ..

I now know two more things ...

Cutting the sensor off causes the air conditioner to not function at all.

The sensor on my GE unit is in fact attatched to the thermostat with copper wire ... so I'm going to get some and we'll see how this splice operation works.
 
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Old 06-16-08, 11:08 AM
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Success

I spliced an extra seven feet of 18 gauge wire between the sensor and the thermostat, so the sensor is now hanging down in the room. The compressor has been humming along nicely for a while now.
 
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Old 06-22-08, 08:54 AM
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I will try the splice and add a few feet of copper wire method soon. As for your theory that if the compressor keeps running it will burn something out, the only thing that will "burn out" will be the refrigerant. I had a Panasonic AC, best damn unit I ever owned, that thing didn't have this sensor and it would just stay on all day if I needed it to and did so for over 5 years [not 5 yrs continuosly, but most of the time during summer months] until my brother placed it in the storage room and my nephew started to "play" with it by dripping water on it and the corrosion just messed it all up.
 
 

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