Goodman AC/heatpump running way to much.


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Old 07-29-08, 06:08 PM
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Goodman AC/heatpump running way to much.

I have a goodman model # gph1336h21ab ac/heatpump. I guess its a 3 ton unit according to the model number. The unit is about 1.5 years old. The "problem" i seem to be having is that it seems to run way to much. Last it was really obvious while I was trying to sleep. The unit would stay on for about 4 minutes and then turn off for 2 minutes. Turn right back on for another 4 or 5 minutes and then off for another 2 minutes. It did this all night. I knew it ran to much when I first got the unit but its never been quite as evident as last night. The temp. outside at the time it was doing this was about 85 degrees and I had the thermostat set on 73 degrees. I guess its a 3 ton unit and my home is about 1400 square feet. Anyone have any ideas on what the problem could be. Is the unit to big for my home?

PS. Don't miss my additional question directly below. Thanks.
 

Last edited by zombieman; 07-29-08 at 08:26 PM.
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Old 07-29-08, 08:00 PM
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One more thing.

I really have paid attention to the thermostat the past few hours.
Right now I have it set on 73 and its 94 outside. its now running for like 10 minutes and staying off for 1 before it turns back on. I can stand there and watch the thermostat and with it set at 73 as soon as it hits 72 the unit turns off. It seem like as soon as the unit kicks off and the thermostat shows 73 again, the unit kicks right back on again. I thought thermostats were suppose to work different from that. Aren't they suppose to not kick on until the temp rises a few degrees more than the thermostat is set to?
 
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Old 08-04-08, 11:28 AM
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that is definitely bad. It sounds like your system might be severely over sized. Either way, a quality thermostat will allow you to set the cycles per hour so you don't burn the system up.
 
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Old 08-04-08, 03:42 PM
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Is this the original thermostat from the installation? I too guess it would guess the issue is either the thermostat itself or a heavily over-sized unit. Does it do this with the heat on too?
 
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Old 08-05-08, 03:24 PM
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Yes it is the thermostat that came with the unit. And yes it runs just as much in the heating cycle when cold outside. The last central unit I had was a 3 ton unit and it did fine. This is also a 3 ton unit but is a heat pump. I purchased the unit though my wifes uncle who installs units for a living. He sized the unit for the house so I wouldn't think it is over-sized, but I guess it could be.
 
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Old 08-05-08, 03:49 PM
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He should show you the load cal!
 
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Old 08-05-08, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by airman.1994
He should show you the load cal!
Whats is this.......................?
 
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Old 08-05-08, 06:21 PM
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This is how you mesure how much cooling and heating you will need.
 
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Old 08-05-08, 08:39 PM
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My house is roughly 55 feet long and 26 feet wide. I used a online cooling load calculator and it showed that in my geographical zone and due to the deminsions my cooling capacity required is: 31490 BTU/hr
I understand you you would want someone with the AC place to figure it but I figure its a pretty close guess. Does this work out about right for a 3 ton unit?
 
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Old 08-05-08, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by zombieman
My house is roughly 55 feet long and 26 feet wide. I used a online cooling load calculator and it showed that in my geographical zone and due to the deminsions my cooling capacity required is: 31490 BTU/hr
I understand you you would want someone with the AC place to figure it but I figure its a pretty close guess. Does this work out about right for a 3 ton unit?

It is not oversized...stop thinking that. - It is (Most likely) an adjustment (0-1 degree Differential) in the T-stat.

*Note: (for you arm chair A/C troubleshooters) If the unit worked before this new unit was installed - and there was no change in the ductwork - It probably is not supply air to T-stat problems.
 
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Old 08-05-08, 09:15 PM
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Just a note regarding the heat loss/load calc., the the one a tech is supposed to use (or that a homeowner could use if willing to purchase - "HVAC Calc") is a comprehensive calculation figuring in room size, air infiltration, insulation etc. Although it should be done when a new unit is installed, it seems your problem is thermostat related as discussed, so you don't have to worry.
 
 

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