High velocity vs standard ac


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Old 08-04-08, 10:14 PM
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High velocity vs standard ac

I am looking into installing central ac in my 35 year old house but have a few questions. First off, where is the difference in the high velocity AC compared to the standard central air? the condensing unit, the air handler or both? Also I was told that the high velocity AC units of today are not anywheres as noisey as the ones 5 years ago, does anyone know what changes were made if this is true to affect the noise. Thanks.
 
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Old 08-05-08, 06:08 PM
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The Standard system takes a regular blower, and ductwork. That will work if you got room in your attic, and able to bring duct down to a lower level.

High Velocity will use a smaller duct (round) and goes off in tubes going to the vents. They cost more money and SEER rating will be lower. If you don't have room in the attic, then this will work.

I haven't been around the newer ones. but the older ones, I thought they were some what quiet.
 
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Old 08-05-08, 07:57 PM
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Originally Posted by palmcoast
I am looking into installing central ac in my 35 year old house but have a few questions. First off, where is the difference in the high velocity AC compared to the standard central air? the condensing unit, the air handler or both? Also I was told that the high velocity AC units of today are not anywheres as noisey as the ones 5 years ago, does anyone know what changes were made if this is true to affect the noise. Thanks.
I think you are confused - High velocity? ...or high effiency...

*There are no "High Velocity" systems at all - Commercial or residential. There are "High Static Pressure systems" - as in trailor homes.

*400 CFM (Cubic Feet Per Minute) = Standard engineered airflow for 1 ton of A/C. Thats all the (Max)velocity you will ever get with 1.5 to 200 ton systems (and larger)... They do slow it down sometimes to accomplish certain cooling programs though. Beyond 400 CFM... you will lose cooling effiency....yep! with huge 10 story buildings containing chillers, VAV's and water towers too!...lol
 

Last edited by The Real Deal; 08-05-08 at 08:37 PM.
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Old 08-07-08, 06:36 AM
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400 cfm is a volume, not a velocity. 400 CFM going through a 10 inch pipe is a lot less velocity than through a 4 inch pipe, and yes this is due to the blowers being able to blow at the higher static pressures.

so in a way you are correct, but I seem to recall a lot of people in the industry referring to them as "high velocity systems".

As velocity increases so does static pressure so either would be a correct description of the systems.
 
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Old 08-07-08, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by shank
400 cfm is a volume, not a velocity. 400 CFM going through a 10 inch pipe is a lot less velocity than through a 4 inch pipe, and yes this is due to the blowers being able to blow at the higher static pressures.

so in a way you are correct, but I seem to recall a lot of people in the industry referring to them as "high velocity systems".

As velocity increases so does static pressure so either would be a correct description of the systems.
I am aware. However, in the context of the question it seems to me it is about effiency. High velocity will be occuring inside the ductwork and not at the register....The difference in throw of the said register will determine the velocity.
 
 

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