Compressor Locked up and now released


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Old 08-30-08, 02:55 PM
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Compressor Locked up and now released

My outdoor Lennox a/c unit contactor started fluttering or has been fluttering for some time. I was told that the contactor may be bad. The single pole contactor had burnt marks on it so I replaced it today. After replacing it the compressor didn't come on so I called the repair man and he came out and told me that the compressor is pulling current and the internal coils are showing the proper ohm values. He said it appears to be locked up. I reviewed some of these posts today and saw the one mentioning that a rubber mallet may un-lock the compressor. Well it worked and the compressor is running. One freon line (small) into the compressor is very hot to the touch where you can't keep your finger on it. The other freon line (larger) is so cold that it has a layer of thin ice on it. I only let it run for a few minutes but the last time I checked these lines before I had problems with the contactor they were not so hot or cold. I suspect the compressor is not circulating the freon. Any thoughts, suggestions or ideas?
 
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Old 08-30-08, 03:20 PM
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Well, it's moving the refrigerant...but thats about as far as my knowlege goes. I don't think ice on the line is good though.
Filters all cleaned?

Hopefully theres a Pro or 2 still checking in.....
 
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Old 08-30-08, 04:42 PM
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You need to check the pressures on both low and high lines. make sure the pressures are both in the normal range. High side(small line) should be warm or warm to a little hot. Not too hot. Low side(large line) should be cold with some condensation water, but not ice outside. This may be caused by some blockage in the line, or simply too much freon in there, or well, there are many other reasons can cause this problem. You need to call a tech to check it out before it burns your compressor or damage your evap, those are big price items.
 
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Old 08-31-08, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by clocert
High side(small line) should be warm or warm to a little hot. Not too hot.
Since you bring that up, about "not too hot" - I frequently run into refrigerators that are running and they are cooling the way they should, where there are no real obvious problems, and the freezer temp is 0 or less, and the fridge compartment is where it should be also. But if you touch the high-side line right by the compressor, when it has been running, before the line gets a lot farther away along the condensor coils, I have literally gotten scorched by that line.

And sometimes the people will say that the refrigerator runs a lot. Yet, all appears normal except the fact that they claim it runs a lot.

Could it be that the unit is low on 'freon', and even though it is able to maintain real cold temps, it is perhaps taking longer to achieve that cold temperature?, and that this will end up wearing out the compressor and run up electric bills needlessly?

...................................................

I pulled out my refrigerator here, while I caught it running - a refrigerator without any known problems - and grabbed the high-side line at the compressor and could only hold the line for 1 second!, and had to let go, because it was too hot. So in light of this, could it actually be normal for these high side lines to actually be HOT, and not to be just described as warm to hot? And I have tough hands from my work, so I know that that line is hot - not towards "warm".
 

Last edited by ecman51; 08-31-08 at 12:02 PM. Reason: added last paragraph
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Old 08-31-08, 01:57 PM
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I don't know how to answer your question since I do not know what kind of pressures should be in the refrigerator's freon line. I Never checked the refrigerator's freon pressure myself. Since the temperaturs of the line go hand in hand with the inside pressure, the right way to check the freon level is to check the pressure of the lines. Hand feel the outside temperature is a home owner's way to check the freon level since most of them don't have the pressure gage. I believe, the refrigerator's freon line is a closed system, very very few case (almost none) that need to add freon. (may be you can post the question on the refrigerator's forum)
 
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Old 08-31-08, 02:43 PM
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After I submitted my post, I got thinking that even though AC and refrigerators are both refrigeration, that there might be something to what you are saying. I thought the best thing for me to do is compare apples to apples and feel several A/C high-side lines as they enter the compressor compartment, and see how they compare for different housing units.
 
 

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