Central Air, not DIY, Pro's please answer

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-10-08, 09:21 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
Central Air, not DIY, Pro's please answer

I am closing on our new to us house this Fri 12/12/08. It is a 1988 Colonial here in CT. I want central air! Nope not going to do it myself, not after reading that post about the guy who did it himself. I have no desire nor time. I would rather restore an old car or build my dream garage, so don't bother trying to talk me into it. With that being said, where do I start besides getting quotes from local guys? What do I look for? What questions do I ask? Etc... I just don't know where to begin to research and I have yet to come across the right place. I see that Spacepack thing. Is that any good? What info do you need on my house?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-10-08, 10:38 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: johnson county, ks
Posts: 338
Originally Posted by CTAllstate View Post
I am closing on our new to us house this Fri 12/12/08. It is a 1988 Colonial here in CT. I want central air! Nope not going to do it myself, not after reading that post about the guy who did it himself. I have no desire nor time. I would rather restore an old car or build my dream garage, so don't bother trying to talk me into it. With that being said, where do I start besides getting quotes from local guys? What do I look for? What questions do I ask? Etc... I just don't know where to begin to research and I have yet to come across the right place. I see that Spacepack thing. Is that any good? What info do you need on my house?

I'm no pro, but I can help. Do not worry as much about equipment as who installs the equipment. Get several estimates, especially if it is not an emergency. Pay attention to the contractor that takes the most time looking over your house before providing an estimate. A good contractor should do a Manual J calculation to properly size your new system.

You should have a good idea of what type of equipment you want. Are you going with A/C and a furnace? Heat pump with backup heat? Do you want electric furnace/backup or fossil fuel? What type of fossil fuel do you have available?
 
  #3  
Old 12-10-08, 12:11 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
I currently have oil. Circulating hot water. That will be replaced soon.

The a/c will be a future project and the house never had ducts. I don't mind taking down some drywall, but I don't want to get out of hand. All I need is the attic and then down to bottom of the second floor/first floor ceiling, right? I have heard about coming down through the closets, but the ones I have seen look like crap. I just want to make sure it is a well balanced system. That is why I want to know things before I start talking to these guys.
 
  #4  
Old 12-10-08, 12:18 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: N. GA
Posts: 106
CTAllstate,

Is this home a 2 story with basement? If so I would use the attic for 1 system and the basement for another. 2 Systems will be more energy efficent, and you don't have to tear up closets.
 
  #5  
Old 12-10-08, 12:50 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
I just got off the phone with a customer who is an HVAC tech and he said the same thing. The deal is I am dealing with my father in law and his million dollar contractor who is advising him. So when I mention wanting to do central air they were like OMG that will be expensive and you will have to go through the closets...blah, blah, blah!

He said 1 unit for the attic, which is unfinished and 1 unit for the basement, which is partialy finished and I don't mind tearing into that.

He said $4k-$6k per unit. Of course he hasn't seen the house yet. Just ballpark stuff.
 
  #6  
Old 12-10-08, 12:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
Originally Posted by Icehouse View Post
E- mail me and I will pass it on to a reputable company.

Icehouse I sent you a PM..........................
 
  #7  
Old 12-10-08, 01:49 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 550
I would recommend keeping the hot water circulating system. Changing over to a gas fired boiler should be more economical.
Ask for educational credentials of the mechanics responsible for any work to the circulating system and their names plus the same for the mechanics who will install the airconditioning system. You want both to have been trained in theory in both trades by a recognized training facility. Don't accept Company credentials; you want individual credentials. On the job training with just experience is not good enough. You want mechanics and technicians who know all the reasons why an installation has to be installed as per manufacturers specifications.
Ask for a two year labor warranty in addition to the 5 or 10 year parts warranty. The one year labor warranty is too short.
Insist on the contract, that the top technician stays on the job from start to finish and the system tested to your satisfaction.
Pay 1/3 down at contract signing, 1/3 when they start work and 1/3 when the job is finished and tested ok to your satisfaction.
If the company says they have many years of experience. Then ask if they have many years of follow up training.

I consider all of these to be good points to separate those installers who have no formal training from the qualified installers who took the time to attend hvac schools and possess certificates in the mechanical installation and servicing of these systems.
 
  #8  
Old 12-11-08, 03:24 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 50
Why Gas Heat ? Gas contains 97,000 btu's of heat per unit, whereas oil contains 144,000 btu's per gallon.
The newest boilers a very efficient, the latest from "Buderus" is the talk of the industry.
The state of Connecticut has the toughest licensing for technicians around.
 
  #9  
Old 12-11-08, 04:46 AM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 550
I must say that I never had a oil burner. For many years, I always heard that gas was more economical then oil. Is the btu per unit equal to btu per gallon? What about the cost of each per unit and per gallon? Way before the past increases in oil, I listen to people complain about the cost of heating their homes with oil.
Have recent improvements in oil burning technology changed that?
 
  #10  
Old 12-11-08, 05:02 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 50
Originally Posted by rjordan392 View Post
I must say that I never had a oil burner. For many years, I always heard that gas was more economical then oil. Is the btu per unit equal to btu per gallon? What about the cost of each per unit and per gallon? Way before the past increases in oil, I listen to people complain about the cost of heating their homes with oil.
Have recent improvements in oil burning technology changed that?
The problem is most people believe the hype the gas companies give. Truth of the matter is they know they are full of it.
Many times here on Long Island, gas heat customers suffered because the temperature was too cold for gas to flow.
The reason most oil heat customers complain is that they will not change. Same boiler for over two decades, and when you try to explain that the newest state of the art systems will save them money, typical response is "Wait till next year".
 
  #11  
Old 12-11-08, 05:47 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: johnson county, ks
Posts: 338
Oil contains more BTUs per unit, but I have yet to see heating with oil be cheaper than Natural Gas or Propane. You should look at it as price per therm, not price per unit.

warmair.com has a nice fuel source cost comparison calculator if you need help deciding.
 
  #12  
Old 12-11-08, 05:58 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 50
Originally Posted by badtlc View Post
Oil contains more BTUs per unit, but I have yet to see heating with oil be cheaper than Natural Gas or Propane. You should look at it as price per therm, not price per unit.

warmair.com has a nice fuel source cost comparison calculator if you need help deciding.
Unit is therm, play on word by the gas companies.
Propane by Star Gas who just happens to own Petro oil.
You can choose your oil companies, not gas. Only Propane dealers.
 
  #13  
Old 12-11-08, 06:09 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 50
Most of the information on that site is out dated and diagrams are wrong.
 
  #14  
Old 12-11-08, 06:31 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
I should have mentioned this before, but I am not going with Gas. I am sticking with Oil.

Reasons why you ask...

Oil is already installed
I would have to pay to remove and dipose of oil tank.
I would have to have a whole in the ground dug to put the gas tank in so it wouldn't have issues flowing as IceHouse mentioned. I didn't know why they buried the tanks to keep them warm, but now I do.
The Gas guy I spoke to himself admitted that Oil with a new burner was more cost effective, but that Gas would rival it in reduced maintenance costs.
Well with the previuos statement how much will it cost for me to remove Oil and bury Gas? How long would I have to wait for the return on that?

I had Gas at my apartment in Boston and a few of my friends complained about their Oil costs. When we averaged it out it was very similiar. These were old houses we were renting so insulation was nil.

The Gas vs Oil debate is fine if we are talking new construction, but in this case it is a different story.
 
  #15  
Old 12-11-08, 06:37 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
I just looked back at the beginning of this thread and didn't realize that I started this thread about A/C not HEAT!

I am in such a tailspin lately with the house closing and other things that I forgot which thread I was in....

SO LET'S KEEP THE DEBATING TO MY CENTRAL AIR QUESTIONS PLEASE!!

Thanks and I appreciate the advice thus far.
 
  #16  
Old 12-11-08, 02:53 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,816
How long do you plan to be at this abode?

Long term (10+) years, go for it. I would get a 21 SEER Lennox R410a, Try get it in a heat pump with a strip heater, make sure they have safetys in it like the low pressure & high pressure controls. Ranco makes a dual pressure control that can be added on. This simple control as an add on will protect your investment. Caution, the Lennox will likely have them already installed. They make the highest quality one out there but they are a bit more too, You get what you pay for. Make sure all the ductwork is sealed with a mastic prior to insulating. Get a quality thermostat like the Honeywell T7350, its very easy to program and I haven't had one fail on me yet.
Make sure you get an actual heating/cooling evaluation by manual J. Take a trip to the utility co and get a list of rebates elidgable from them. If you get a smaller boiler this will qualify for a rebate, Manual J gets a rebate, higher SEERs get a rebate, sealed ducts pressure tested get a rebate....get movin! I'm just the tech and have seen these in Massachusetts at the supply house and CN I think is the same utility. Let them foot a part of the bill.
The debate between gas and oil is is multiple...you cant compare gallons of oil to cubic feet of gas. Gas can easily achieve 90% the last ten years. Oil usually gets about 82% just after its tuned. you loose floorspace for the storage tank in the basement. Oil requires annual maintenance or it will likely stop in the middle of winter. Gas on the other hand could blow the house off the foundation. I think happened not too far from where you useto live. A puffback is the worst I've heard from oil, and usually from the home owner pushing the reset over and over. My Uncle useto say,"Go modern,go gas, go boom". He's pro oil but works on everything. Maintenance can be skipped a few years with gas and will usually keep working without too much trouble. Others will shrill at my saying this I'm sure. I have serviced many gas units and have rarely had to brush one down. When I did it would last at least 5 years before I would have to do it again. There are other problem with gas units but not preventive wise.
If you get the A/C for the 2nd floor make sure a secondary pan is installed with a float safety switch in the event of a condesate failure you don't want to have the ceiling fall in to let you know. Have it all spelled out in the contract. Have your stat wire run as 18/8. This way if one fails you will have spares without having to run another wire. An 18/5 to the condensing unit. If your a stickler for appearance have the lineset set in slim-duct, this is a plastic split duct in the form of a gutter that hides the appearance of the piping along side the outside of the house. Its usually white but I imagine it comes in a brown too. Insist on 1/2" wall insulation on the piping. Make sure they install a condensate trap on the airhandler. If they don't think about this ahead of time, its a pain to get the offset distance drop, if everthing is already connected. I usually use heat pump legs under the air handler, and sit the unit in the oversized secondary pan. Then a 4" trap with clean out is easily achieved. Some units don't have to be trapped if the drain line is on the positive side. Many are not. The trap either way, will keep ALL the conditioned air in the space. Make sure you have enough power in the service panel to include the stip heaters. If you choose the heat pump have the heat from the boiler come on at about 40F and automatically drop out the heat pump. This should keep your bills for heat and cooling low. In this way if you ever have a heat failure, you could over-ride the outdoor thermostat and use the heat pump till the boiler gets fixed.
What does it have for hot water? is it a tankless or a stand alone unit, or an indirect unit (a zone off the boiler) with a storage tank.
 
  #17  
Old 12-16-08, 08:35 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Vagrant
Posts: 220
Man that dude can type. That was a book, the first 1000 words looked to be darn good advice not sure about the end my eyes got tired.
 
  #18  
Old 12-17-08, 06:06 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
Originally Posted by Saturn View Post
Man that dude can type. That was a book, the first 1000 words looked to be darn good advice not sure about the end my eyes got tired.

Yes he can. I didn't reply to him because he went on a tangent about heating and gas. THIS THREAD ISN'T ABOUT HEATING!!!!! I CAN'T MAKE THAT CLEAR ENOUGH!!!

I am also not going to install this anytime soon and I would never remember half of the technical stuff he mentioned. I was hoping for statements like Trane is better than so and so. Stuff like that, you know.
 
  #19  
Old 12-17-08, 08:46 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 15
Originally Posted by CTAllstate View Post
THIS THREAD ISN'T ABOUT HEATING!!!!! I CAN'T MAKE THAT CLEAR ENOUGH!!!
I was hoping for statements like Trane is better than so and so. Stuff like that, you know.
With that attitude you will never see the answer was clearly there! You cannot talk about A/C without talking about heat because it's the SAME THING! A/C being taking heat away, Heat being adding it in. This is why they call it HVAC and not "Furnace".

At any rate there is some golden info there, especially with regards to having the correct drain pans installed in your attic A/C unit to prevent ceiling collapse when the inevitable water leak happens. You will always need to consider the heating system when looking for A/C. If all you wanted was a brand name you should ask the salesman and not the "pro's". Pro's care about the quality of the install and very little about name brands.

Good luck!
 
  #20  
Old 12-17-08, 09:20 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
Originally Posted by viennatech View Post
With that attitude you will never see the answer was clearly there! You cannot talk about A/C without talking about heat because it's the SAME THING! A/C being taking heat away, Heat being adding it in. This is why they call it HVAC and not "Furnace".

At any rate there is some golden info there, especially with regards to having the correct drain pans installed in your attic A/C unit to prevent ceiling collapse when the inevitable water leak happens. You will always need to consider the heating system when looking for A/C. If all you wanted was a brand name you should ask the salesman and not the "pro's". Pro's care about the quality of the install and very little about name brands.

Good luck!
Well I guess people just don't get it. I have an oil fired furnace with forced hot water so that is my heating system. I will install a seperate system for the cooling of the house. The technical nature of that person's post went on and on about a gas fired system. I would appreciate people reading my posts and answering my questions. If you don't want to THAN DON'T ANSWER MY POSTS!!

My attitude is that of every American who is fed up with people not listening or in this case not reading. I appreciate the advice that is pertinent and I am frustrated with the unsolicited advice that doesn't have anything to do with my question.

The Pro's should consider brand name's just as much as installation because if they do a really good install of crap equipment than they will still get call backs regardless of how pretty it looks.
 
  #21  
Old 12-17-08, 02:55 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,816
in your own words...

where do I start besides getting quotes from local guys? What do I look for? What questions do I ask?
If you just wanted a recomendation for a brand, try American Standard or Lennox with the highest SEER you can get. Print out selective parts of what I said earlier and get a quote from that. And don't forget to check with your local utility....It will save you MONEY! Conciece enough?
 
  #22  
Old 12-17-08, 04:37 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 50
Did you hear from the contractor that I sent your info to. ?
 
  #23  
Old 12-18-08, 05:50 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
Originally Posted by hvac01453 View Post
where do I start besides getting quotes from local guys? What do I look for? What questions do I ask?
If you just wanted a recomendation for a brand, try American Standard or Lennox with the highest SEER you can get. Print out selective parts of what I said earlier and get a quote from that. And don't forget to check with your local utility....It will save you MONEY! Conciece enough?

Yes, thank you. I wasn't trying to knock you, but you provided so much info over my head. Yes, what do I look for, what do I ask? Those are the best questions. How do I know which contractor is good? Besides getting quotes and checking references what else can I look for? I will look back on your reply as I know there was information that does pertain to what I need.
 
  #24  
Old 12-18-08, 05:55 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
Originally Posted by Icehouse View Post
Did you hear from the contractor that I sent your info to. ?
Yes immediately, but we won't being pulling the trigger for a while so not much I can do with him now. I was hoping by posting here that I would get a lot of suggestions as to which system to go with. etc.. then I would start researching that before I started getting quotes. I mean, I don't know, is that all I can do is get quotes than throw them up here for debate? I wanted to be more educated first. I wanted to have an idea of what I wanted first. HVAC01453 threw so much at me with both heat and ac it will take me a while to decipher. I was hoping for more of a generic response like you want American standard 2 ton unit with blah, blah... Does that make sense?
 
  #25  
Old 12-18-08, 06:20 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 50
The four I would recommend in no particular order:
1.Carrier
2.Lennox
3. Trane
4. Coleman
There are others that are excellent, but these are who I have had the best experience with as far as support, customer service, and satisfaction.
No need for all the technical aspects.
 
  #26  
Old 12-18-08, 07:47 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: johnson county, ks
Posts: 338
Some systems info.....

1) Carrier: pricey but very nice, fully integrated systems that are simple to use and very high quality with tons of features.

2) Amana: The Amana line, not the distinctions or Goodman, have better efficiency ratings than Carrier, Lennox, Trane, Rheem, etc. They are nice, quality equipment but more of an open source system. They don't come with fully integrated air filtration, humidification, thermostat controls, etc. like Carrier does. I chose to go with Amana due to the energy performance.

3) Lennox: The biggest advantage to Lennox is they are really quiet systems. They are pricier than Amana, but don't have the efficiency ratings like HSPF and EER that Amana does. It doesn't have the total solution options like Carrier does.

4) Trane/American standard: If looking at heat pumps, you have to be careful because some of their heat pumps have poor HSPF ratings. I also don't like cleaning a spiney coil.

In the end, the system will only be as good as the installer.
 
  #27  
Old 12-18-08, 10:41 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
Everyone keeps mention heat pumps, but I have no clue as to what they are. Could someone elaborate please.
 
  #28  
Old 12-18-08, 10:47 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: N. GA
Posts: 106
In laymenís terms itís an air conditioner that works backwards in heat mode.

Have you ever gone outside in the summer and felt the air coming off the air conditioning unit? Thatís the heat from your house, a heat pump just pull whatever heat it can from the outside and brings it inside. A/C in reverse.
 
  #29  
Old 12-18-08, 10:52 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
Originally Posted by Mr Happy View Post
In laymenís terms itís an air conditioner that works backwards in heat mode.

Have you ever gone outside in the summer and felt the air coming off the air conditioning unit? Thatís the heat from your house, a heat pump just pull whatever heat it can from the outside and brings it inside. A/C in reverse.
Perhaps I don't fully understand, but why would anyone want to pull hot air in when are trtying to cool the house?
 
  #30  
Old 12-18-08, 10:57 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: N. GA
Posts: 106
the heat pump works both ways, durring cooling season there is a reversing valve that reverses the flow of refrigerant.

See in the summer it is an air conditioner for cooling, and an air conditioner in the winter for heating.

Most heat pumps energize the reversing valve for cooling with the exception of REEM, RUDD they are energized in heating.
 
  #31  
Old 12-18-08, 10:59 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: johnson county, ks
Posts: 338
Originally Posted by CTAllstate View Post
Perhaps I don't fully understand, but why would anyone want to pull hot air in when are trtying to cool the house?
You only use it to heat when the weather is cold. Typically, heat pumps are 300% electrically efficient down to around 40 degrees F. From there, they can drop to 150% electrically efficient down to around 0 degrees. They are a fantastic money saver for many many homes out there. Typically, you will need some sort of furnace or auxiliary heat for temperatures below 30 degrees because the HP loses capacity with temperature.
 
  #32  
Old 12-18-08, 11:02 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: N. GA
Posts: 106
Originally Posted by CTAllstate View Post
Perhaps I don't fully understand, but why would anyone want to pull hot air in when are trtying to cool the house?
A bit longer explanation

Heat pumps work like air conditioners during the summer and reverse to become air heaters during the winter. During the summer, refrigerant is piped through the indoor coils, absorbs heat from the room air, and vaporizes. The cooled room air is then re-circulated in the house by a blower. The vaporized refrigerant flows into the compressor, which pumps the refrigerant to the outdoor coil, where it condenses back into a liquid by releasing its heat to the outdoor air. Air is circulated through the outside unit by a fan. The cooled refrigerant then flows back to the indoor coil, where the heat transfer cycle is repeated.

In the heating mode, the refrigerant flow is reversed, bringing heat inside from outdoors, essentially working like a conventional air conditioner in reverse. Cold refrigerant is piped through the outdoor coils, absorbing heat from the outside air. The refrigerant vaporizes and flows into the compressor, which pumps it to the indoor coil, where it condenses back into a liquid by releasing its heat to the indoor air. The refrigerant then flows back to the outdoor coils, where the heat transfer cycle starts again.

Like refrigerators, most heat pumps have defrost cycles that minimize frost buildup on the evaporator during the winter heating cycle. Defrost occurs automatically at pre-set time intervals. Defrosting works against the efficiency of the unit when it switches into defrost mode unnecessarily, wasting heating and cooling capacity. Microprocessor controls in some units prevent this from happening. Some controls even determine whether the heat pump or back-up heat is more economical at a particular outdoor air temperature and switch to that heating system.
 
  #33  
Old 12-18-08, 11:08 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,105
CT...no HVAC guy...but I don't think you are looking at heat pumps. They act as heat and A/C supplies. Basically they reverse the cycle and draw heat from outside in cold weather (yes, it can be done) and draw heat from the interior in warm weather.

Sorry yer not getting cold facts, but the truth is, its not that easy. The first thing that you need is an analysis of your home to determine your needs. This includes room sizes, number and type of windows and doors, amount of insulation, type of construction, average outside temps,etc, etc. There are online resources that can give you basic numbers with a few hours work on your part.

After you know what size unit you would need, you can start comparing brands. Then you can determine what you can afford. Much of your cost will probably be determined by the complexity of routing the ducting. More labor than anything else...and the only way to get that is to get quotes from multiple contractors.

This is just input from a layman.

btw you said a 1988 Colonial??? Maybe 1888? Hard to imagine a home built in 1988 w/o A/C.

Some contractors only like to work with certain brands, for whatever reasons. Good experiences, good support, good kickbacks...lol...
 
  #34  
Old 12-18-08, 11:11 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 15
Originally Posted by CTAllstate View Post
Perhaps I don't fully understand, but why would anyone want to pull hot air in when are trtying to cool the house?
This explains your frustration yesterday when people kept intermingling the two. I recognize it seems easier to think in terms of furnace=heat and A/C=cold but in reality these devices aren't that seperate.

If it helps, try to think in terms of "more hot" or "less hot" instead of hot and cold. A furnace's job is to make the inside "more hot" then the outside of the house. An a/c's job is to do the opposite, make the inside "less hot" then the outside.

By this simple definition, ALL A/C units are "heat pumps", in that they will pump heat from inside to outside. SOME A/C units can work in "reverse" which will then pump the heat from outside to inside. (These are then officially known as heat pumps).

Now, all these wonderful people are trying to help you save money when if you are going to pay for an A/C anyways, you COULD buy a heat pump which will then allow you both hot and cold functions.

Since you didn't want to hear that, the message kinda got lost. There is a lot of great info in this post however to set you well on your way. What is the temperature range normal for your geographical location?
 
  #35  
Old 12-18-08, 11:41 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: CT
Posts: 17
OK this is starting to make sense to me. I have been told that radiant heat is very efficient so stick with it. Yes it was built in 1988 not 1888. I have no idea why someone would build a 2500 sq ft colonial without central air, but they did. So I can also get some outside air in the winter to help with the oil fired furnace. I didn't realize that the winter weather was that warm. I am on the coast of CT and I have no idea what zone that is. I will do a load calc as soon as we get unpacked. Too much other stuff going on now.
 
  #36  
Old 12-18-08, 11:49 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,105
CT...I may be wrong, and I hope someone will NICELY correct me if I am. A straight A/C unit will probably be cheaper (equipment wise) than a heat pump. Certainly less complicated if repairs are needed.

And I missed the part where you are just moving in. You have plenty of other stuff to do, don't get worked up over A/C. Maybe there is a reason, maybe you don't really need it in your climate. Give it a summer to find out.
 
  #37  
Old 12-18-08, 12:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: johnson county, ks
Posts: 338
Straight A/C is cheaper than a heat pump, but not by a whole lot. The payback for a heat pump is normally very quick. Sometimes it can be less than a year depending on rates and compared choices.
 
  #38  
Old 12-18-08, 02:22 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 50
Maybe this will help

http://www.inspect-ny.com/aircond/1208s.jpg This is a schematic of a basic air cooled A/C.
A heat pump would have two more components not shown. They are a second expansion valve and a reversing valve.
The reversing valve reverses the refrigerant flow in the "Heat" mode and the second valve is used in conjunction with the condenser coil as this now becomes the evaporator.
Also more electrical controls as there is a need for a defrost system when the outside temperatures go below freezing.
I hope this helps give a better understanding of a heat pump and it's operation.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes