Air handler location


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Old 01-12-09, 04:47 AM
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Air handler location

I am adding a new 15'x35' kitchen to my 100 year old house and considering central air. One of the contractors that I brought in advised that it would be OK to locate it in the kitchen and dressed in cabinetry so that we wouldn't need extra return duct work. Also so we wouldnt need to break through the concrete slab. He said that this is not out of the ordinary. He also said that it would not make much noise once insulated and dressed in cabinetry. My question is...how much noise can a 5 ton Carrier air handler make?
 
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Old 01-12-09, 04:40 PM
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Just looked at data for the highest end unit. Lower octave range is about 65 dB, overall ranges about 50 dB.

If it's done right you may notice it running as white noise and not be bothered.

Did you have a specific model in mind?
 
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Old 01-13-09, 01:37 AM
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Probable something new and energy efficient, Do you have any recommendations?

Originally Posted by Jarredsdad
Just looked at data for the highest end unit. Lower octave range is about 65 dB, overall ranges about 50 dB.

If it's done right you may notice it running as white noise and not be bothered.

Did you have a specific model in mind?
 
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Old 01-13-09, 01:42 AM
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If I wrap it in insulation and enclose it in a cabinet would the noise get cut in half?

Originally Posted by Jarredsdad
Just looked at data for the highest end unit. Lower octave range is about 65 dB, overall ranges about 50 dB.

If it's done right you may notice it running as white noise and not be bothered.

Did you have a specific model in mind?
 
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Old 01-13-09, 04:34 AM
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Id recommend at least a 15 seer in a heat pump. Wrapping the duct will not help with noise only lining the inside of the duct will. Make sure they do not put the return in or near the kitchen.
 
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Old 01-13-09, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Jarredsdad
Just looked at data for the highest end unit. Lower octave range is about 65 dB, overall ranges about 50 dB.
I am in a similar situation where noise is of concern. I am moving our 5 ton system from the garage to the attic and considering a new Goodman GMV95 / GCV9 Air handler (furnace).

I looked at the specs but could not find the noise dB level for these furnaces. Anyone knows?
 
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Old 01-13-09, 10:49 AM
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No HVAC guy...but I can't imagine having the air handler packed into a cabinet in the living space. I mean, sure the old wall heater types, of course.

Pro's, have any of you actually seen or done this?

Oh, and I noticed in the OP that the contractor said that would avoid extra return ductwork, which means the return would be....where?
 
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Old 01-14-09, 01:54 AM
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The reccomendation was to put the return in the kitchen, facing an area where the ducts will not reach.

What else can i do to minimize noise and/or increase efficiency?

Originally Posted by airman.1994
Id recommend at least a 15 seer in a heat pump. Wrapping the duct will not help with noise only lining the inside of the duct will. Make sure they do not put the return in or near the kitchen.
 
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Old 01-14-09, 02:01 AM
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Why not in a cabinet in the living space? How about all the units that are in the attic that are just as close to living space? Don't forget the size of the kitchen is 15x35. That is the size of some homeowners whole house.




Originally Posted by Gunguy45
No HVAC guy...but I can't imagine having the air handler packed into a cabinet in the living space. I mean, sure the old wall heater types, of course.

Pro's, have any of you actually seen or done this?

Oh, and I noticed in the OP that the contractor said that would avoid extra return ductwork, which means the return would be....where?
 
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Old 01-14-09, 04:06 AM
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It's against code to have a return in the kitchen.
 
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Old 01-14-09, 06:55 AM
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Is this for obvious reasons?

Originally Posted by airman.1994
It's against code to have a return in the kitchen.
 
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Old 01-14-09, 01:13 PM
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Yes!! Grease, Fires, Odors etc.
 
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Old 01-14-09, 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by zizanio
Is this for obvious reasons?
Nothing like frying fish or any smelly dish and having the air system propegate that smell (and grease) quickly all over the house.

Terrible idea.

We have our return air grill not in the kitchen, but close to it and when we fry fish, we can't have the air system on.
 
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Old 01-15-09, 04:16 AM
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Is the air handler return duct size nomally the same size as the supply side?
 
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Old 01-15-09, 02:20 PM
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Nope return should be bigger!
 
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Old 01-15-09, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by airman.1994
Nope return should be bigger!
Bigger is always better

For my 5 ton air handler, I need a minimum of 500 square inches of openinng (not counting length of run, static resitance of filters, etc).

On my new 5-ton system I am considering, I am looking at about 700 sq of return ( 2 350sq grills).
 
 

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