Should I repair or replace my AC due to poor cooling?


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Old 04-05-09, 08:44 PM
W
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Should I repair or replace my AC due to poor cooling?

I own a 4 year old 2-story, 2500 sft, Craftsman home that is cooled by two 2-ton units. During the past summer, I noticed that the upstairs unit failed to cool the home properly when the outside temperature got over 92 degrees - the unit would run constantly and would not achieve the set cooling temperature until 11:30PM at night. I have had two service calls to check the freon levels and everything checks out fine each time. I also checked with my neighbors who have an identical floor plan and cooling setup and they have had no issues. We never saw this type of performance problem years 1-2, so we are baffled by the sudden change.

With the summer approaching I am faced with the question of whether I should replace my unit with a new larger unit or should I call different company out to see if they can find the mysterious reason for the lack of cooling. I would really hate to spend $5000 for no good reason.

Also, one that I have noticed about the problem unit is that the line that brings the hot coolant back to the condensing coil is always lukewarm - even on the hottest days. Since this unit cools the upstairs, I would think that it would be moving more heat and should therefore be pretty hot, Right? In comparison, the identical downstairs unit's return is always much hotter - even on cooler days. Could something just simply be faulty and in need of replacement or must I replace the whole darn thing?
 
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Old 04-06-09, 05:49 AM
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Also, one that I have noticed about the problem unit is that the line that brings the hot coolant back to the condensing coil is always lukewarm - even on the hottest days. Since this unit cools the upstairs, I would think that it would be moving more heat and should therefore be pretty hot, Right?
Refrigerant moves from the compressor to the condenser coil. Then through the liquid line (small copper tube) to the metering device (located at or close to the evaporator coil). The refrigerant then flows into the evaporator coil.

Anyway, if your system cooled normally during the first 2 years, and doesn't cool well now, there is a problem with the system (not the tonnage). Find a good A/C technician to look over the system thoroughly.
 
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Old 04-06-09, 11:50 AM
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Take a look at the your equipment, is it Trane, York, Carrier, etc. Once you determine what it is find a good local HVAC company that installs your brand and set up a service call. As Jim said, its a problem with the unit.
 
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Old 04-06-09, 04:05 PM
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Thanks for the suggestions. The system is a hybrid, payne condensing and goodman evaporator. The orginal outsides units were stolen right before we moved in. I have a service call scheduled for late June. The service tech that I called said it would be best to come service when the conditions are warmer..
 
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Old 04-08-09, 03:49 AM
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a good service tech can simulate a warm day with any outside temp.during service call.those lines your refering to the thin copper line from the condenser is the liquid being sent to the evap/fan section and the insulated bigger line in the Suction freon coming back to the condenser.the liquid line should run 80F luke warm....warmer as the days temps rise into the 90s.the insulated on should always be ice cold ..if it is anything else your short on freon which in turn is your tonnage.if you have metering device in the air handler it might be faulty,compressor might be shot on the valves..ifyou can't put your hand on the discharge line within the condenser that is a good thing!your pressure reading were what with what outside air running into the condenser...and how was the split air temps on the evaporator.that it changed all of a sudden something running in the system is out of wack.are you running R-22?
 
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Old 04-08-09, 07:57 PM
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Its an R22 unit and the smaller line is the one that is lukewarm. I have an identical unit that cools the lower floor and its small line always feels much hotter. I will definately call a service tech out sooner if I need to. I do not want to be suffering 98+ degree days with no ac upstairs. Do you think that having a tech bleed, vacuum, and recharge the system is a good first step?
 
 

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