Copper lines temperature?

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Old 06-14-09, 05:58 PM
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Copper lines temperature?

My daughter’s central air has stopped cooling. I have been reading the posts here and after checking her system I have come to the conclusion her York unit needs to be charged. Must be a leak somewhere. My question has to do with the two copper lines that connect the out and inside components. One is insulated and one is not. When I first started the AC after being off all night the insulated line became cold but after a while the temperature different between the two lines wasn’t noticeable by touch. Shouldn’t the insulated line stay much colder than the other line? Is this another indication of a low charge (leak)?
Thanks
Charlie 327th Sig. Site Octopus 1968-1969
 
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Old 06-14-09, 07:50 PM
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The insulated line should remain colder than the other one so long the compressor keeps running. If the compressor were to stop, the temperatures equalize.

It appears that in your case, the compressor starts, but later on, and for whatever reason, such is no longer the case.

Have you noticed if the coil indoors ices-up?

You can't conclude that this unit is low in refrigerant with the information you have provided. Yes, it is a possibility indeed, but further testing is necessary. You could very well have an electrical problem here.
 
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Old 06-14-09, 08:50 PM
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Thanks pflor for answering.

"The insulated line should remain colder than the other one so long the compressor keeps running. If the compressor were to stop, the temperatures equalize." I don't believe the compressor is shutting off. I can hear it running. Now, is it working??

"Have you noticed if the coil indoors ices-up?" Not directly. The register air flow will decrease with time and if AC is allowed to run for hours the air flow will almost stop.
 
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Old 06-15-09, 05:33 AM
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It may have a leak, or a blocked coil, or a blocked air filter, your best bet at this point would be to contact a good local service company. If it is low on charge, make sure they locate and repair the leak.
 
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Old 06-15-09, 05:43 AM
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My replies to your latest (red) comments below (in blue)
Originally Posted by cgc68 View Post
Thanks pflor for answering.

"The insulated line should remain colder than the other one so long the compressor keeps running. If the compressor were to stop, the temperatures equalize." I don't believe the compressor is shutting off. I can hear it running. Now, is it working?? From what you just report, yes, it does appear that it keeps working

"Have you noticed if the coil indoors ices-up?" Not directly. The register air flow will decrease with time and if AC is allowed to run for hours the air flow will almost stop. Well, a progressive decrease in the airflow would suggest that the coil is building-up a layer of ice over time. The usual reason is a low refrigerant charge. It appears then that there's a leak somewhere there. Dun's advice for fixing the leak prior to charging is sound. You should call a service provider to take care of this.
 
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Old 06-15-09, 09:14 AM
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Both of your advice sounds sound. A York service provider has been called and we are awaiting his arrival, today.

Again thanks

charlie
 
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Old 06-15-09, 03:28 PM
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Well the service man came and went and the AC is working again. The unit was low on Freon and there was a leak. I know some won't approve but one of his options was to seal the leak with some stuff in a can like fix a flat. The unit is 11 years old so we didn't want to invest a lot of money. He said if the leak was small this stuff would work. He said it would not hurt the system or its components.

I want to thank you who provide information for caring enough to help people like me. Love the diversity of the forums. I have added this site to my favorites.

charlie
 
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Old 06-15-09, 03:39 PM
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Well, glad its working...but yeah..you'll probably get some grief from the Pro's about the fix.

11 y/o isn't really that old...not as efficient as the newer units sure..but with a little maintenance, no reason it couldn't have gone 8 or 9 more.
 
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Old 06-16-09, 12:59 AM
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Yea, my Carrier is just 13 years old, had two recharges over that time, nothing else....I think it should see 20.

And its a 13 EER, so it's not economical to upgrade just for economy sake.
 
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Old 06-16-09, 04:59 AM
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All I can say is good luck
 
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Old 06-16-09, 03:26 PM
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Sealers make me nervous. It's really best to repair the leak using traditional methods.
I wonder what happens if the system has to be opened for future repairs?
I would also say there is zero chance of reusing the lineset when the system is finally replaced. I can only hope that the lineset is easily accessible and its replacement will not cause thousands of dollars of damage to interior walls and ceilings.
 
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Old 06-16-09, 04:07 PM
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If what you used is called super seal it is reactive with moisture. Which means when it comes into contact with moisture, such as humidity, it will coagulate to seal the leak. If your system ran in a vacuum from being low and sucked in any moisture you may have problems. Otherwise you should be ok if the sealer was used according to instructions until the system is open for repairs. Have seen it work good and have seen disasters from it.
 
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Old 06-24-09, 08:13 AM
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update

Hi Guys

Update The system is still working great. I got some of the reactions from you that I expected. I know the sealer wasn't the bestway to go for the future but time and money was a big factor. The line set is short and easy to get to. Life is a gamble sometimes you win sometimes you lose. When the sealer bites me in the bu** I'll be back.

Thanks for all the advice have a great day

charlie
 
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