should I move my thermostat?


  #1  
Old 05-30-10, 02:04 AM
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should I move my thermostat?

My thermostat is currently in a hallway near the bedrooms and bathroom. It is on a wall just on the other of the water heater closet and right below the attic access (which has no insulation on the other side - yet).

The thermometer near the living room reads 73 degrees but the thermostat reads 79 degrees and my AC is running way too much even for north central texas.

Is the thermostat is the right location or should I move it elsewhere in the house?

just wondering

Mitch
 
  #2  
Old 05-30-10, 04:53 AM
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Re-direct Your Efforts

You should provide a thermometer reading beside the thermostat to determine its accuracy. If the thermostat is roughly accurate, then your problem is a very large temperature differential existing within your home. You seem to imply that you know that by stating: “(which has no insulation on the other side - yet)”. For sake of argument, if you determine there is a real 6 degree temperature differential in areas of your home, the next issue is whether it is a persistent condition during the months when using you’re A/C. If so, then a simple adjustment of your thermostat to meet your comfort needs in the living room will produce the same effect of spending your time moving your thermostat. For example, increasing the thermostat to 83 degrees will kick-on you’re A/C so that your living room is around 77 degrees (assuming a 6 degree differential). However, the hallway may then be too hot, and uncomfortable for your needs but the same problem will exist by moving your thermostat so nothing is gained while time and money is lost.

Presumably, you understand there is a tremendous waste of energy that translates into throwing money away if the temperature differentials are as large as you suggest. It’s like leaving a door wide open allowing hot air to enter your home while trying to cool off other areas to meet your comfort needs. If there is a large temperature differential, then you would be wise to focus your efforts correcting that problem (e.g., water heater blanket, attic insulation, attic access seal, attic exhaust fan, etc.) as there will be a quick payback period from the resulting energy savings. Your electric utility company may perform free energy audits for residential customers which will identify problems and possible solutions, and may offer rebates for some of the costs incurred.
 
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Old 05-31-10, 04:12 AM
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thanks for replying. I was hoping moving the thermostat would be the last choice. I climed up in the attic to see how hard it would be and found the wire just runs along the attic floor from the furnace where it comes through the ceiling - would be somewhat easy if I need to.

my first chore is to insulate the attic access, finish putting in soffett vents, and installing a turbine vent. After all that I'll see where I stand.

Thanks again for the advice.
 
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Old 06-21-10, 02:33 AM
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Just an update

Soffett vents are in (although I still need to get up there and make sure all the insulation is moved to allow air to flow in). Turbine vent installed.

This has made somewhat a difference in the temp in my home, however at around 5 pm the thermostat will jump from 78 degrees to 80 degrees and stay there until around 8 pm. Still the same situation - living room reads about 75 or 76 while the hall is 80. I'll know more today after I buy a small digital thermometer to check temps at 5pm.

My house faces east and I have no trees to shade it from the late afternoon sun (at least not yet - I planted a weeping willow in the front and back and I planted two apple trees and two pomegranate trees in the back as well -- but the shade is still two or three years away) so I know that is a factor.

If anyone wants to chime in, I will appreciate suggestions.

If I decide to move the thermostat, where is the best location? Is the central point in the home the best? or near the return?

Thanks

Mitch
 
 

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