Cost of High-Velocity AC install


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Old 06-30-10, 10:26 AM
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Cost of High-Velocity AC install

How much would a pro HVAC guy charge me (roughly) to install a high-velocity AC system in my late 1800s colonial? Roughly 2,000 sq/ft house. Attic over original part of house covers upstairs 3 bedrooms and 1st floor is LR and DR. Kitchen, office, and both bathrooms (1 on each floor) is part of an addition that has neither an attic or basement below, only crawl space. Steam radiator heating. Small closets. Live in central NJ area.
 
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Old 06-30-10, 12:48 PM
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What is high velocity AC ? ..
 
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Old 06-30-10, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by clocert
What is high velocity AC ? ..
Google is your friend: Unico System Inc. - Unico Interactive Just one of many manufactures.
 
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Old 06-30-10, 07:47 PM
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Never priced one! Make sure you are aware of the draw backs before you get one.
 
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Old 07-02-10, 09:24 AM
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Airman; I've done some searching and the drawbacks I have seen so far: 1) noise of air movement which has been somewhat dealt with recently by newer duct technology 2) being directly under/above a vent can be uncomfortable, which can be solved by better vent placement (if possible). Do you know of other "con's" with these type of systems? Also, do you know if retrofitting a house with this type of system will generally cost more/less/about the same as a traditional system? Is this something an experience HVAC guy can install, or it should be someone who is trained in this specific system?
 
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Old 07-02-10, 07:22 PM
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I don't know how the equipment costs compare, but I would think there will be less work in running the ducts throughout the house because they are less intrusive.
 
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Old 07-02-10, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by DBR35
Airman; I've done some searching and the drawbacks I have seen so far: 1) noise of air movement which has been somewhat dealt with recently by newer duct technology 2) being directly under/above a vent can be uncomfortable, which can be solved by better vent placement (if possible). Do you know of other "con's" with these type of systems? Also, do you know if retrofitting a house with this type of system will generally cost more/less/about the same as a traditional system? Is this something an experience HVAC guy can install, or it should be someone who is trained in this specific system?
Also uneven temps in rooms because the vents do not disperse the air very well. Any good company could put one in. Don''t know the cost!
 
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Old 07-02-10, 08:09 PM
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There are only a few manufacturers of high velocity systems, Unico being the best known. I would be hesitant in having a company that had never installed a high-velocity system doing my install.

High-velocity systems MUST be very carefully engineered AND installed or there WILL be excessive problems with noise and poorly mixed room along with drafts. I do not recommend high-velocity systems in residential unless there is absolutely no other choice. High-velocity systems WILL be more expensive to operate and will cost at least as much to install as more conventional ducted systems. Unless your home is landmarked or otherwise eligible for historic preservation grant money I would strongly advise you to look elsewhere than at a high-velocity system.
 
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Old 07-03-10, 03:27 PM
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Thank you for your input Furd. I'm not sure how I could exactly do it with the layout of my house, but what are your thoughts on these mini-split (multi-mini-split) systems which can connect to a number of separate indoor units. I think the wall mounted inside units are unsightly, but I do see that many of the manufacturers make ceiling mounted "registers" which are design to "hide" better. Thoughts on these?
 
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Old 07-03-10, 09:51 PM
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The mini-splits with the well-known names (Mitsubishi and Sanyo come to mind) are good units. The unknown names, Chinese knock-off units may have issues related to longevity. Understand that split-systems are almost never DIY installable due to the requirement of evacuating the connecting tubing and adjusting the refrigerant charge. You might be able to work with a certified A/C technician and do the majority of the electrical and mechanical work leaving the actual connection of the tubing along with the evacuation, leak testing and charge adjusting to the tech.
 
 

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