How do I determine model # of circa 1983 GE thru wall AC unit?

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Old 07-08-10, 02:02 PM
J
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How do I determine model # of circa 1983 GE thru wall AC unit?

I'm trying to help a lady from church who has issues with her GE thru wall window AC unit, in a condo that was built in 6/1983, so I'm assuming the AC is from 1983 or pretty close. We looked everywhere, no stickers or model number indication anywhere, not on side, bottom, top, inside the controls lid, nothing.

Does anyone have an idea of what model numbers were around back then?

Then I can enter them on the GE site to bring up a manual that might be close, I want to see the spec and BTUs, etc on this unit.

One of the issues is the ridiculous washable ac filters that slide down the front of her unit, have lost their stiffness, and don't like to slide all the way down anymore, so I want to try to order new parts for her. These filters are perfectly clean, but they slide vertically down the front panel of the AC (unlike newer models that slide down into the top of the AC), then the handle/top of the filter snaps into place on the front of the unit. Since they don't want to slide all the way down anymore, she's gushing air there at the 2 front slots for these filters.

On top of that, there is cold air leaking all over both sides of the unit, every nook and cranny. Some places/nooks/crannies you can really feel a cool breeze gushing out. Landlord had a "professional licensed ac guy" come out who taped a few places but did such a poor job that some still leak right past the tape due to bad application of the tape. In another spot he used duct tape. In some spots, his poor taping job does not even make contact with the area he intended!

I was thinking of using aluminum tape to tape up the seams, does this sound right?

Her main problem is the builder jury rigged a 10" square NON-insulated sheet metal duct out of the side of this unit, and it goes through the drywall from the living room to her bedroom, and hardly any air is making it out the bedroom vent. Granted this is an old unit, losing it's umph, but I think the problem is all the air that's leaking throughout all the seams around the unit, and maybe the power of the unit is not enough for this 1 bedroom condo. Either way, I think all the leaks are reducing air pressure to the bedroom vent.

Any help would be appreciated. Throw some potential model numbers my way and I'll take a look.

Also, any advise on plugging these leaks, should I use silicon bead or just tape it?

I don't have any pictures to post yet, sorry.


Jeff
 
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Old 07-08-10, 05:40 PM
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I don't understand the problem with these leaks. If the leaking cold air is going into her apartment, how is it a problem?

I don't think that 10" vent is worth having. A through the wall A/C just isn't designed to function with ductwork. I would try disconnecting that thing and setting up a fan to blow cold air from the living room into her bedroom.
 
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Old 07-08-10, 05:55 PM
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You're missing my point about the air leaks around the seams and why it's a problem. First of all leaks are never good, and saying that "it's just leaking the cold air into the aprtment" does not make sense. You're missing out on the nature of the problem this causes. Also here in Florida, this cold air seeping out where it should not be, can cause water buildup at these seams, and corrosion. If you get enough moisture built up, you could get mold. The cold air should blow out the blower vent, where it's not in contact with metal seams, it just meets the room air. Just like regular wall mounted AC register vents, if you don't put gaskets on them, on really humid days, cold air seeps out the cracks between the wall and the vent grate, and you accumulate water, sometimes even get staining.

First, the leaks will prevent the proper amount of air from blowing into the duct to the next room. GE provides these duct kits, and apaprently thinks it works as long as you don't extend them longer than the kit length that they provide you. I beleive these ducts are 8" square, not 10" like I mentioned before.

Also, if the AC has air leaks all around the seams, this means the cold air is being deposited near the floor, instead of being blown out at the designed force from the blower vent on top of the machine, which blows the air upwards, toward humans. You want to air condition people, not the floor.

I'm not even happy that the air vent in the bedroom is only 2 feet off the ground. We intend to put a small floor fan in front of her bedroom vent to pull the cold air from the vent and blow it around her room.

I suspect the unit might be a Zoneline III or Zoneline IV, based ona tidbit of info on GE's web site that mentioned units made prior to 1987 are Zoneline I, II, III, or IV.

But I cannot find an owner's manual for it online.
 
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Old 07-08-10, 06:47 PM
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It is most likely an AJ.....model. That would be good news, because they are still made today, and you can drop a new one right into the sleeve. ( sleeve size measures 26W x 15 5/8"

Take off the front grill ( couple of screws SOMEWHERE, probably) Model number will be AJaann.....

The aa will indicate cooling only, heap pump, electirc heat, high mount, etc. I can decode that for you. nn is the BTU. It will be like 05, 08,09,10,12,14 indicating how many thousand BTU. The remaining letters will indicate 120 vs 240, and some other totally transparent variations.

If it is not an AJ, the model number will decode in similar fashion.

As far as this kind of unit feeding a second room, it is not unheard of, and for some models, GE makes purpose - built adapters and duct work. You just have to remember that X many btu will only cool so many square feet.
 
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Old 07-09-10, 06:36 AM
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I'm going to try to get over there today to remove her grill and get the model number. The duct kit is made and supplied by GE, but it seems that cold air is leaking around all the connections of it. I plan on doing a more thorough analysis of where and why the air is leaking.
 
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Old 07-09-10, 01:10 PM
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I found the model#: AZ28E15DAB from the Zoneline Deluxe 2800 Series. I was in for a shock because this unit looked 27 years old, but the manufacturing date says 2006! Looks like the landlord replaced it 4 years ago, but it's in horrible shape.

The ac unit with the duct adapter on top


Because the extender is not straight, they left a big gap. on Flickr


Here's what I found. The idiots who installed huge duct adapter on top of the AC did not use enough screws to secure it, so the brackets supplied by GE were not being utilized properly. This means the duct unit was not sealed against the top of the AC unit, and left gaps in several places because it had shifted a bit. In fact, since they apparently ran out of screws, they used duct tape to try to secure the retaining bracket to the duct assembly. Real dumb move. I tore all of it off and found a couple of screws to improve the situation. I need to go back later with a buddy and secure more screws properly, it’s a 2 person job really.

Duct extension enters the hole that is too big in the drywall.


Second, they did not plan this duct placement so that the extender would be straight, going to the bedroom wall. This is because they cut a hole too big in the wall for the duct extender, and it was a bout an inch over to the left too much! Shear stupidity. I sealed the drywall opening all the way around the duct with aluminum tape, which put an end to the air leak. The morons left a 1 Ĺ” gap! Duh, no wonder hardly any air is getting to the bedroom.

I also sprayed coil foam on the coils and combed them out with a coil comb. I put everything back together more solid than the install guy did and plugged up seams with tape, until next week we will come back with rubber insulation to close up some of the seams, and tape them over.

At least for now, we got a lot more air flow coming out of the bedroom vent than what she had before, now she is a very happy camper.

BTW, the blue image links above are linkable to my photos, but for some reason, I can't get these flickr photos to show up right below the links, the code looks right on the forum using the insert picture command link to my photos, but it comes back with a red x.

Here's the specs on the unit. Not sure if it's enough BTUs for a 600 SQ ft apartment or not, but at least the air is blowing out cold in the bedroom, but only light to moderate. Better than it was before.

14,600/14,300 BTUH
• 10.2/10.2 E.E.R.
• 4.5 Dehumidification (pts/hr)
• 310 CFM Indoor Fan (High)
• 260 CFM Indoor Fan (Low)
• 75/45 Vent CFM
• Electronic 7-Step Temperature Limiting To Prevent Overcooling or Overheating of Room
• Heat Sentinel
 

Last edited by jeffostroff; 07-09-10 at 01:26 PM.
 

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