What part is this


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Old 07-26-10, 06:25 AM
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What part is this

I had service come out. They didn't even check out this. I took some parts apart (with main power off of course). Is this something they should have visually checked? It is a Copeland compressor on a 4 ton carrier unit. What part is this that connects to the compressor? I want to sound knowledgeable before I call anyone else...also want to know if it something I can replace myself. Does the melting/corrosion likely indicate a larger problem/fire hazard? The melting could have occurred recently but the corrosion looks like it has been there for some time.

Thanks!!


 
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Old 07-26-10, 06:28 AM
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Old 07-26-10, 06:37 AM
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For the picture to appear you need to use the url of the actual photo in the Insert Image function rather than the webpage the photo is on.
 
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Old 07-26-10, 07:40 PM
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Old 07-26-10, 08:30 PM
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What you have there is the electrical connector for the compressor.

They are not that easy to get but aside from that the corroded connectors on the compressor are more of a problem.
They would at the very least need to be cleaned and polished to new condition or the connector could heat up.
This is a very fragile area on a compressor as the terminals are embedded in pressure resistant glass.
Any serious overheating of the terminals when in operation or physical damage when cleaning could cause the glass to fail.
Although it is not that common, when this glass connector fails refrigerant and oil under pressure can blow out of the hole.

I personally do not repair these connectors when they look like yours for fear of liability.
Your problem IMO would warrant the compressor to be replaced.
 
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Old 07-27-10, 05:28 AM
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Greg,

Thank you for your explanation of the problem and for your suggestion....will be replacing the compressor. Safety is always priority #1.

Thanks!! Tim

Funny: I just noticed you are from Manitoba! I'm a former Winnipeg who moved down to Dallas and its heat 8 yrs ago!
 

Last edited by tjdfw; 07-27-10 at 05:30 AM. Reason: post script
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Old 07-27-10, 06:00 AM
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Many techs will sand the terminals and use standard push on spade connectors from their tool box to get it running and it usually works.
The problem I have found is that once the metal terminal has been overheated it offers resistance at the connection and runs hot.

It is quite uncommon for this to happen but I had a terminal blow out while energized on a restaurant rooftop a/c on Grant Ave. in Wpg many years ago.
Fortunately I was standing aside as a flaming stream of oil mixed with refrigerant streamed out.
It would have been my fault if there were any injuries as it was quickly learned that you do not energize any equipment with covers removed that I still heed to this day!

Ya, I too am from Wpg but went the other way and moved 600 km North 28 yrs ago.
 
 

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