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Old 09-10-10, 09:58 AM
L
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I have another question: I have a very old A/C unit. I have been having problems and began calling places to come and diagnose/fix. The prices varied GREATLY, and were as high as $1,500 to fix, but with no gaurantee that it would last much longer; ultimately advising that I need a new system altogether. Just looking at the A/C unit it seems very likely that a new system is needed, it's as old as the house (30 years). So, I have been saving as much as I can to buy a new system altogether, and I have been told to save just under $4,000 for the system. In the meantime I have been having an A/C repair man come out and fix the system when it goes out. The first time it was an $800 coil replacement and freon charge, next it was changing out the wiring that is connected to the compressor ($45 service charge), and most recently it was a $325 replacing of the fan. Everytime I pay I am using money from my savings for a new system, putting me back that much further from a new system. Ok, my question: Is it possible that if I replace all the parts that I would in essence have a decent A/C system? At this rate I seem to be replacing all the major parts bit by bit. Are there problems with having a "frankenstein" type of A/C unit? It's working nice now, but I know that it will probably be a short while that the compressor will go out.

Any thoughts or ideas out there? Thank you!!

Gabriel
 
  #2  
Old 09-10-10, 01:08 PM
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Assume the fan you just replaced is the air handler's blower, then the only other big item is the condenser(compressor) which will cost you some where around $1400 to $1800. After that you actually have a new system except line set and meter unit, but those two are hardly go wrong, So you can expect it to run for another 8 to 10 years without any major problems. Question for you. Have you considered the electricity bill between the new and old systems ?
 
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Old 09-10-10, 01:40 PM
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Thanks for the reply, and your answer is what I was thinking; that I may be able to "build" a system with many more years of life. And, you bring up a point that I did not mention but I have considered: energy cost of old versus new system. I do think that I would have a huge savings from a new system. I just posed the question because I am just getting concerned that I may take a really long time to be able to come up with the money for a whole new system. Thanks for the reply and I welcome any other comments or questions.
 
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Old 09-10-10, 04:10 PM
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And don't forget the $1500 energy credit. I don't know if it would even apply to repair parts and it definitely doesn't apply to labor.
 
 

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