Janitrol Airhandler wiring question...


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Old 05-24-11, 11:44 PM
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Janitrol Airhandler wiring question...

A/C has been down for the better part of May.
Noticed it wasn't blowing cool, checked the line, frozen.
Had A/C guy come out and charge up the unit the next day.
All is well for 6 or 7 days then bam, out of freon again.
A/C stated a leak was the problem. OK.
Charged it up again, went out 2 days later.
This time the home owner contacted their insurance company, they send out service contractor to check it, they determined a leak... but didn't know where.
He dispatched another contractor to come out and look for the leak.
They thought they found the leak in the coil inside the airhandler inside.
Said that the entire unit would need to be replaced, because they stated the coils were unavailble??
Ok, 2 days later, the guy comes out to replace the airhandler, but notices a problem.
He stated that the unit was improperly wired.
That an electrician would need to come out and rewire from the breaker to the AC unit before they would even attempt to replace the unit.
What he described seemed plausible, but unlikely due to the fact that the house isn't that old, and the entire unit was installed less than 15 years ago.
He showed me the wires that are currently at the breaker on the airhandler.
There shows to be a 60amp breaker, and a 30 amp breaker like so:

GND====================GND
+++++ +++++ +++++ +++++
+60====60+ +30====30+
+++++ +++++ +++++ +++++
==========================

The 60 and 40 amp wires from the outside box are attached just above both
60's, and jumpered over to the 30's.
As in, from each 60, there is a wire looped over to each 30.
He stated this was a problem, and would burn the house down.

Needless to say, I took it upon myself to investigate the so-called "problem".

I looked at the outside breaker box for the house, there are two breakers, one 60 and one 40, that are labled "Heater" and "A/C" respectively.
I've no doubt that both lines are what are connected.
I did not test them to make sure, and neither did he.

So, on the front of the unit, it gives a diagram, and on this diagram, it clearly displays this as the correct way to install this unit.
My question is, why does an electrician need to be called out if there is nothing wrong?
I have taken pictures of it, and will post in my next post.
Can someone please take a look at this and give me an educated guess as to why he insists that it's incorrect?
 
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Old 05-25-11, 12:04 AM
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This is the breaker set:




Here is a link to the photos:

AC and Wiring - a set on Flickr
 
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Old 05-25-11, 05:33 AM
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the unit is wired correctly at the breakers in the unit. as long as the amp draw does not exceed the rated breaker in your electrical box. If it does exceed the amperage at the breaker box than you might need an upgraded breaker. however that shouldn't be the case if it is rated correctly. If the wiring from the breaker to the unit is within code than you need another opinion.
 
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Old 05-25-11, 05:36 AM
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it does look like the wires coming out of the unit are not protected that might be the problem the tech is seeing. the wires going from the unit to the breaker need to be wrapped or enclosed .
 
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Old 05-25-11, 08:39 AM
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Brian, thank you for replying.
No, the issue wasn't sheilding, he clearly stated that what was ran to the AC unit from the breaker was incorrect.
I'm going to call the contractors and explain the situation.
Thank you for your advice.
 
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Old 05-25-11, 06:13 PM
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The photo in the post shows the incoming side of the breakers for the air handler. What size breaker in your panel supplies the air handler? From what I gather it is a 60. If that is correct, I would need to know how much electric heat is installed in the air handler to determine if that breaker is of the correct size for the installed load.
 
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Old 05-25-11, 08:16 PM
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I am no electric furnace expert, but judging from the amperage ratings and pictures, it appears to me that you have a 2 circuit 15 KW electric furnace (3 - 5 KW elements), but with one 5 KW element disconnected. Note that circuit #1 is for 5 KW at 240 volts and circuit #2 is for 10 KW at 240 volts. There is obviously ony one 60 amp circuit running to the furnace. With one 5 KW element disconnected, there is no need for the 30 amp circuit except that the blower motor and/or controls may be powered from the 30 amp circuit. Or, it could be the 5 KW element that was disconnected was supposed to be powered from circuit #2. It's my opinion that this is why there are jumpers from the 60 amp circuit breaker to the 30 amp circuit breaker in the furnace. I see no reason it wouldn't be safe except that the electrician double lugged the #6 wires when making the jumper, that is illegal by code (NEC), unless the lugs are rated for 2 conductors which I doubt they are. The 40 amp circuit in your panel must go to the condensing unit outside. By the way, the furnace schematic shows jumpers on the line side of the the circuit breakers if the furnace is wired as a 1 circuit furnace.
 
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Old 05-26-11, 02:17 PM
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You have been running 10kw of heat. If that was adequate, simply tell your HVAC technician to install an air handler with 10kw of heat. Problem solved. Your existing wiring is good to go.

You can always upgrade later should you need that additional 5kw of heat. Most air handlers have add-on or electric heat "kits" that install within the unit. At that time you can have an electrician run an additional 30 amp circuit to power the third heat strip.
 
 

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