Gas Line condensing in wall and creating mold


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Old 09-05-11, 03:32 PM
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Gas Line condensing in wall and creating mold

While I planned on changing the insulation on the gas line from brick to compressoir, while doing a bathroom remodel, I found mold in the wall where the line 90's into the wall and goes to attic. I can feel the insulation going up a bit, and I really don't want to take down more wall board than is necessary as it seems the mold is isolated with 8 inches or so from the bottom plate. What would be the best method to prevent this from reoccuring, I am installing marble in this room and covering the wall in bead board. So I really don't want to revisit this. *****************
 

Last edited by GregH; 09-05-11 at 05:56 PM. Reason: Email address removed.......not allowed in posts.
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Old 09-05-11, 05:18 PM
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not sure, try a different thread for more help
 
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Old 09-05-11, 05:32 PM
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Sry, thought this was the AC forum.
 
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Old 09-05-11, 05:55 PM
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Thumbs up Welcome to our forums!

This is the correct forum.
Your terminology might be confusing.
I am unsure of what "from brick to compressor" exactly means.
I assume that you have a refrigerant line from your a/c in the wall space and it is poorly insulated.

The correct long term fix for this is to have the line re-routed to an exterior space.
A refrigerant line in many trades people's perspective is a serviceable item and should not be hidden........along the lines of an electrical junction box.

It is very difficult to give you a definite plan to fix this because what you need to do depends on how the line was installed.
I have seen holes drilled to make a pathway for refrigerant lines but the holes were too small and the insulation ripped off.
Because of the low temperature of the lines and the fact that they condense moisture in the air so heavily, the insulation has to be continuous with no open joints.
Also, the insulation that you use on these lines needs to be moisture proof and thick enough for the application.
One brand used in the trade is Armaflex but there are others and normally 1/2 inch minimum wall thickness for a quality job.

The insulation found in hardware and box stores for water lines will not do the job, especially if hidden!
 
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Old 09-05-11, 06:43 PM
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Thanks

Thank you Greg, I thought of running the tubing through the soffit and down the brick. btw Compressor to brick meant, from the compressor unit to the brick on the side of the house. Would the insulation be enough for the weather in Mississippi, gets to 100 degrees easily. I suppose I will call the AC guy and let him handle it, I don't wish to get in the attic, its very narrow and hotttt...
 
 

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