Best way to clean a condenser unit with the hose?


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Old 06-18-12, 04:20 PM
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Best way to clean a condenser unit with the hose?

For any of you who recall my other thread, we just replaced our Carrier 4 ton condenser with a 3.5 ton Payne unit, for our central air here.

Here in the Denver area, we have lots of cottonwoods that put out cotton in the air in the summer and it needs cleaning already.

I used to just spray a fine mist around it first, while it was running, to prevent thermal shock to the metals, and then shoot a hose nozzle through it all around, from the outside, but the guy who installed this one says you're supposed to clean them from the inside blowing out.

So what's the best way to clean a condenser with the hose?
 
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Old 06-18-12, 04:43 PM
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shut off the power, remove the fan, spray with water from inside out, reassemble, turn on power.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 04:53 PM
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Remove the fan???

How hard is that?
 
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Old 06-18-12, 04:57 PM
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Normally about 8 screws...but you have to support it somehow unless you disconnect the electrical.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 04:59 PM
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If it is all rusty outside including screws, it can be hard.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 05:03 PM
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its not hard, on a carrier it is 4 screws and some wiring.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 05:07 PM
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clocert....they just replaced it.....brand new.

Melissa...this is something normally very easy to do. I did it every year to my old place. During fall leaves would fall in to it and it would be a mess inside. I finally attached some hardware cloth over the top that I would put on after summer and take off in spring. They really made a difference and didn't restrict airflow if it kicked on. I also replaced the plated screws with stainless when they started to rust. $2 well spent.

The HVAC tech that I had come out for a problem at about year 13 said it was probably the cleanest condenser he'd ever seen for it's age.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 05:30 PM
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I was thinking of getting a winter cover for this.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 05:39 PM
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Everything I've seen says that's a bad idea. Maybe if it just covers the top it would be ok...but don't enclose the whole thing.

Of course Denver is different from most places....do you get warm days mid- Dec or Jan?
 
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Old 06-18-12, 06:09 PM
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Sorry, I did not catch that. If it is a new unit, no problem at all. I was thinking of my own unit, 18 years old, the screws are all rusted, no threads anymore.
 
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Old 06-18-12, 06:13 PM
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No, in December or January we MIGHT get a 70 degree day, but not warm enough to use the AC.
 
 

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