Old Unit AC, repair or replace?

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Old 07-03-12, 01:21 AM
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Old Unit AC, repair or replace?

Hello,

I have an Amana "First Edition" unit air conditioner, very old (manufacturer could not give me a model # or anything / no matching pics in google), probably 10-15,000 BTUs judging by the size (big-arse). Blower works fine and it does blow cool air.

It started blowing the circuit breaker on its dedicated 15 amp outlet when the temperature outside started to get over 85 degrees. After a day or two of this (and messing around with the temp control, noticing the cord getting hot etc.) the breaker went bad.

The unit has been running on this outlet for two years without issue s'far as I know, though I did notice when I moved in the extension cord it was plugged into was not heavy duty and a little stuck due to heat build up - replaced immediately and had no issue since, (it still got pretty hot upstairs in this unit before the roof was painted white) Breaker is fixed - now what?

I've read that if the compressor is going bad on old units they could draw more power, thus the circuit breaker mess that happened. Assuming that is the reason (and the wiring is all up to code etc.),

is it cost effective to have the unit serviced? Or is that usually a "replace super expensive compressor part" that is probably on par with a cheap replacement from craigslist? Obviously I'm budget conscious here

Or am I way off the mark and this is clearly a wiring / not enough power getting to my box in the warehouse size 10 unit building I'm living in...

Thanks for any suggestions / feedback!
 
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Old 07-03-12, 05:22 AM
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you will have a hard time finding someone to work on a unit that is not a central air unit. You are best to replace it.
 
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Old 07-03-12, 12:47 PM
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A completely clogged condenser coil (the outdoor coil) can increase amp draw.

Try cleaning it from the fan side. (the part that you can't see)
 
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