Compressor runs but doesn't cool

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  #1  
Old 07-13-12, 02:00 PM
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Compressor runs but doesn't cool

Hi Team,

I couldn't find an answer by searching, so I registered and here goes:

I have a 2.5 ton Bryant heat pump, 8 years old. The thermostat is calling for cooling, contactor on the outside unit is pulled in, fan is running, compressor is running, pulling about 5 amps, but the system is not cooling. The air entering and leaving the condenser and evap coils are just about equal.

Any ideas what I should be checking for? I'm guessing a clogged orifice, but that's not something I can self-diagnose, or is it?

Also, a couple days ago the thermostat was calling for cooling but wouldn't activate the outdoor or indoor blowers/fans/compressors. It's working now and pulling the contactors in, but that wouldn't have anything to do with my current issue, would it?

thanks!
 

Last edited by hvacpe; 07-13-12 at 02:02 PM. Reason: add'l info
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Old 07-13-12, 02:04 PM
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The compressor is not running at 5 amps unless you have a very efficient a/c..... how do the pipes leaving the condensor feel? Small - warm/hot? Large cool/cold?

Is the capacitor swollen on the top?

You may need to call a pro to check refrigerant level.
 
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Old 07-14-12, 04:23 AM
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The RLA of the compressor is 13.1 amps and it is drawing 5. The suction and liquid lines are both ambient temperature. The capacitor checks out fine.

I know I probably need to call a tech and have the levels checked, but just looking for help on anything easy I may have overlooked, and also advice on whether the thermostat issue is just a coincidence or could have something to do with a heat pump not working (like a reversing valve issue or something). I have a new stat, so I may just try it out.

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-16-12, 08:57 AM
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Tech was just here, there's a leak and the entire 5lbs dumped. It's 8 years old, and I'm thinking rather than spend close to $1,000 to find the leak and recharge it at $144/lb, I'm probably better off replacing it with a more efficient system.
 
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Old 07-16-12, 09:03 AM
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Tech was just here, there's a leak and the entire 5lbs dumped. It's 8 years old, and I'm thinking rather than spend close to $1,000 to find the leak and recharge it at $144/lb, I'm probably better off replacing it with a more efficient system.
A $144 a lb for R-22; WOW!
 
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Old 07-16-12, 09:07 AM
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A $144 a lb for R-22; WOW!
That was my reaction, too! My guess was $40/lb and the tech laughed.

How much should it cost?
 
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Old 07-16-12, 11:16 AM
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Call another tech... ........................................
 
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Old 07-16-12, 11:38 AM
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I just called another, and they are reluctant to check out the leak. Both seem to agree, with an 8 year old builder-grade system, it doesn't make sense to spend $600-1000 to get it working and get maybe 1-2 more years out of it, vs. installing a new more efficient system. They're coming out to give me another estimate.
 
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