Condenser doesn't kick in....

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-05-12, 12:21 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Condenser doesn't kick in....

Hi all,
We have a Carrier central ac system and I notice the cooling is not consistent. If I turn it on after several hours of no activity, the house cools just fine. However, when I leave it in cool on the thermostat and it cycles off and then back on...it takes a good while, close to an hour or two before the cool air comes back on again. Meanwhile, the house gets warmer from the uncooled air coming back in. It eventually will kick in with cold air, but like I said after a significantly long while. I could be wrong, but this doesn't seem normal...

Any and all suggestions on what I ccould tinker with or test out would be great and much appreciated.

Thanks,
Thad
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-05-12, 04:24 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Texas, California
Posts: 1,462
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Is the condenser running while the uncooled air comes into the house ?
 
  #3  
Old 08-05-12, 08:17 PM
user 10's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 2,008
Received 35 Votes on 30 Posts
Outside, do you hear the sound change when it actually starts cooling?

Like in this video: Carrier Heat Pump AC Compressor Problem - YouTube
 
  #4  
Old 08-06-12, 08:24 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, I do keep hearing that 2 second hum sound like in the video for a while before cool air actually starts coming in again. The lights will usually dim when the 2 second hum sounds too. The 2 second hums happen every five to ten minutes and could last up to an hour or more before the cool air starts again. My compressor is not as noisy as the videos. There is a constant buzzing sound like something is running in the unit even without the cool air coming in...Im not sure if there is a sound difference when the cool air starts...
 
  #5  
Old 08-06-12, 07:54 PM
hvactechfw's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,245
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
check your capacitor and it sounds like you may need a hard start kit as your compressor windings may be starting to fail.
 
  #6  
Old 08-07-12, 11:19 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How does one go about "checking my capacitor"? And would this be uncommon for a unit that is two years old and had at most moderate use?
Thanks, any help would be much appreciated....
 
  #7  
Old 08-07-12, 12:10 PM
user 10's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 2,008
Received 35 Votes on 30 Posts
^Time to call a technician.
 
  #8  
Old 08-07-12, 01:22 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Actually no, the reason I'm posting here is to not do that. Can anyone help me try to understand by posting links to videos or articles instead of giving up on me immediately? Thanks to all helpers, would love post a successful do it yourself story which is what I thought the point of this forum is....
 
  #9  
Old 08-07-12, 01:26 PM
hvactechfw's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,245
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
A meter to check a capacitor is much more expensive than a $20 capacitor. Replace the capacitor.
 
  #10  
Old 08-07-12, 03:33 PM
user 10's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NA
Posts: 2,008
Received 35 Votes on 30 Posts
I'm really for DIY repairs, but some electrical knowledge is required - ie being able to identify a capacitor, how to use a meter to check resistance/voltage, how to read schematics.

There's a risk of serious injury - shutting off the wrong breaker (or having one leg still active due to a faulty breaker or disconnect), getting zapped by a charged capacitor, etc.

There are some good repair videos on youtube, but you'll be better off calling a tech to do it. The capacitor may not be bad; there could be another problem which is preventing the compressor from starting.
 
  #11  
Old 08-07-12, 08:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Texas, California
Posts: 1,462
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I agree with hvactech.. you may need a hard start kit. but go ahead replace the capacitor first, you can take the old capacitor down and measure it with a multi-meter (meter with capacitance function costs around $50). If that still does not work, then try the hard start kit.. But as mentioned, be careful, you don't want to be zapped..
 
  #12  
Old 08-08-12, 09:48 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My breakers are clearly and correctly labeled. Is it normal for a capacitor to only last two years? Also, my unit is slightly tilted, would this have something to do with it? Thanks for the advice on a hard start kit....
 
  #13  
Old 08-08-12, 06:34 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Texas, California
Posts: 1,462
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have seen many capacitors last only 1 year.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: