Window AC Full Of Water

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  #1  
Old 08-15-12, 01:57 PM
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Window AC Full Of Water

Brother just bought this for his bedroom:

Kenmore 5,200 BTU Room Air Conditioner ENERGY STARŪ - Appliances - Air Conditioners - Window Air Conditioners


After using for about a month he went to move it to another window and got soaked from all the water inside.

He installed with a 1/4" slope away from the window, maybe a little more. He says there is no drain hole which I found odd. The directions say with BIG letters: DO NOT DRILL HOLE IN DRAIN PAN.

What? Where is this water supposed to go? New one on me.

Any ideas?

Thanks
 
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Old 08-15-12, 02:27 PM
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They use a slinger fan to cool the condenser,might have to use fan only to dry or tip it.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 04:07 PM
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Guyold, what would you lose by drilling a hole to drain the water out? Its a window unit so I am not sure if a lose of efficiency will be noticeable. I think that's why the manufacturers do this no? Better cooling capacity?

Also with these slinger types don't they clog the air cooled condenser faster hence shorter life span for those who don't clean them often?
 
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Old 08-15-12, 04:30 PM
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The condensate gets splashed on the coil to improve cooling capacity and efficiency.

The solution to the problem is to run the unit in fan only mode to dry out the pan.

"Also with these slinger types don't they clog the air cooled condenser faster hence shorter life span for those who don't clean them often?"

Condensate is practically distilled so there's no risk of having the coil plug up with minerals.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 04:59 PM
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I agree that the condensate splashing against the coil is part of the design.
1/4" slope sounds about right but you would do well to check the installation manual for their recommended slope.

It also would be normal for there to be a quantity of water in the pan if it had been recently operating.
 
  #6  
Old 08-15-12, 10:36 PM
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I drilled a hole in my window a/c to drain the water, it was collecting significant quantities of dirt and bugs. They probably say this to avoid having people drill into the condenser and call them up asking why their a/c won't cool.
 
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Old 08-16-12, 04:06 AM
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Uh, no.
They say this because if the unit is working properly drilling a hole is not necessary and in humid climates will slightly reduce the unit's capacity.
 
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Old 08-16-12, 01:31 PM
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Okay, sounds normal then. Probably explains why they have a grill on top of the cabinet so the rain can go right in. More water to cool the coil the better as long as it doesn't come inside.

Thanks guys, I'll let him know.
 
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Old 08-16-12, 01:48 PM
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i recently borrowed one of these from a friend when my central a/c went out. the bottom was close to rusting out because of this design. how does that help its life? even the compressor bottom was rusting like crazy.
 
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Old 08-16-12, 03:07 PM
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One reason that bottoms are rusting out of more recent vintage window a/c units is because they are more affordable to the masses.
In 1986 a 10,000 BTU window unit was selling for just over $800.00.
Today they can be had for almost a third of that.
Many of the more recent vintage have metal bottoms but the rest is Styrofoam with metal strapping embedded where the fan or other components are mounted.

I am sure that there are better quality units out there that may last longer except not many would buy them.

Relating to the low cost of some appliances my employer had purchased 10 compact fridges that are a popular name brand from W*****t and were only just off warranty.
When time came to replace a part and i called the 1-800 number on the back and was told parts weren't available.
When I called the name brand company they couldn't find the model number i had but when I told them it was purchased from W*****t, they said no parts are made for them.
So, I decommissioned it and took it to the dump.
 
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Old 08-18-12, 03:09 AM
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GregH has hit it on the head; modern window a/c's are meant to be throw away items, much like the microwaves are. They are engineered to be right on the edge of what is necessary to have them perform. No extra care is taken in manufacturing to prevent corrosion and the minimum quality parts are used because you are expected to replace it in three years. The water slinging fan principle allows the manufacturer to use a smaller condenser coil to achieve the necessary heat rejection.....it is part of the required design. If you drill a drain, you upset the heat rejection capability designed into the machine and YOU WILL reduce both it's efficiency and it's life span. If not enough of the heat is rejected at the condenser, the freon carries unwanted heat back to the compressor resulting in higher running temp at the compressor, shortening it's life. This excess heat is then passed on to the evaporator coil which results in higher evaporator temps which reduces the temp differential for room air. If you want a modern room a/c to last more than a few seasons, you should pull it at the end of each season, back flush the condenser and evaporator, clean the fan, collection pan, and inspect all metal parts for the beginning of rust. Wire brush off any beginning rust and spray on a couple of coats of "Cold galvanize" paint. A window a/c can last ten years or more if this procedure is followed. This splash type a/c is particularly susceptible to corrosion in salt air areas, where salt from the outdoor air accumulates in the slinger condensate water and is then slung into the condenser coil accelerating corrosion.
 
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