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Old 11-20-12, 03:54 AM
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technical question here

I am planning to make a ground water heat exchanger out of finned coil copper, and I am wondering what the best wrap will be ? should I supply the water from the top or supply the water from the bottom, bearing in mind that it must drain gravitationally after each cycle also should it be a continous wrap from top to bottom or should it zig zag from top to bottom / bottom to top in a tight z fashion? please advise thanks in advance...!! Oh and there will be a fan pulling air thru to top...
 
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Old 11-20-12, 04:42 AM
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It is not totally clear what you mean by heat exchanger.
You mention finned coil copper and wrap???
Is this a water/water or water/air or water/glycol exchanger???

Do you have a drawing or picture examples of what you want to build?
 
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Old 11-20-12, 04:11 PM
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It will be water to air, and the coils will be 3/4 copper tubing with a L-fin fins attached which I am having manufactured and bent to my specs. it will basically be constructed like any outdoor ac condensor.
 
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Old 11-21-12, 03:16 AM
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It will not make a huge difference which way the the water flows except if you want the coil to drain you will need to have it enter from the top.
You also may need to install a vacuum break if the coil has to completely empty.

What is more important is the flow rate of water through the coil.
For maximum efficiency you will have to ensure that the water flow rate allows maximim transfer of heat.
To fast and you will not absorb enough heat and too slow and you will reduce the capacity of the coil.

Can you describe the system and components in a bit more detail and how you came up with 3/4" for a tubing size.
Seems kinda big.

They actually make coils for this purpose.
 
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Old 11-27-12, 08:02 AM
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thanks for your interest Greg H I cannot say alot for proprietary reasons, however the 3/4 inch is a guess, I fig. I can restrict the flow to allow the water to stay in the coil longer for more heat dissipation. flow, velocity and time are all directly proportional to heat transfer and of course surface exposure and air flow play a large part as well, So without getting to technical I just want to experiment with this size and adjust flow accordingly with output dia. sizing. I have enough water supply for up to 15 gpm.
 
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