reverse valve


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Old 05-19-13, 12:38 PM
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reverse valve

I have a 3-year old Carrier HVAC. The first year, it works fine. But the second year, the TXV was replaced. Last night, it wouldn't do any cooling work. An AC company checked it this morning, first saying, it's too high pressure. Then saying the pump doesn't work. A new reverse valve needs to be replaced. This is the same company doing twice a year maintenance for me. I just wonder why this almost new system has so many trouble? Thanks for your advice in advance.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 12:41 PM
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An entire reversing valve or just the solenoid ?
 
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Old 05-19-13, 02:35 PM
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I didn't ask. He is saying it cost $800+ and give me a discount to $670. I guess that's whole valve. Is it reasonable?
 
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Old 05-19-13, 07:22 PM
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I've never seen "too high pressure" be caused by a bad reversing valve. "The pump", usually refers to the compressor. Something appears to be amiss here. I would get a second opinion if I were you.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 07:52 PM
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I'm not the pro here but I could see the valve causing an issue if it didn't fully change.

It almost sounds like they're fighting installer error here.

What is the warranty on this unit ?

The pro's will be by later.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 08:13 PM
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The reversing valve can shift the low pressure suction pipe into the high pressure hot gas line.

I would also recommend a second opinion. If the problem were only the reversing valve selonoid coil the part should be under warranty and the installation should be ~ 15 minutes.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 03:55 AM
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It could be the RV..... I also recommend a second opinion. IF the coil is good...... a good tech could try some things like raising the pressure specifics ways to get the RV unstuck before going straight to replacement.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 12:41 PM
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Thanks all for your reply. I just got another company checked the AC. He showed me the two numbers on his device. 250 for suction line and 260 for the high pressure line. He is suggesting to change compressor and TXV, which I changed last August. He is also saying that the suction line AMP is only 6, which should be 15+.

Now I need to decide to let which company to work on it. Any advice?
 
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Old 05-20-13, 01:43 PM
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Equalized pressures like those usually indicate either the compressor is bad, not pumping or the reversing valve is bad. The TXV should have nothing to do with it. Hard to say who to go with since I'm still a little confused by your first post. I'm not sure if the tech didn't know what he was doing or you are mis quoting him? Saying that the pump is bad, usually means he is talking about the compressor. Also he said the high pressure was high which according to your second tech it wasn't. The pressures were equalized, which is usually indicative of a bad reversing valve or a bad compressor, not both. You still may need another opinion or maybe give us some more information about what the first tech said. And when you say the suction line amps are six, I'm sure either you or the tech meant compressor amps.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 04:14 PM
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The first guy came here, measured the pressure. And he said the pressure is too high. So he released some pressure from outside unit. They he came back inside. But the temperature didn't go down much. He went outside again, this time he said the pump doesn't work.

Yes. It should be the compressor amp from the second tech. He said because the amp is low, it's more likely the compressor is bad.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 06:49 PM
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I think that the tech that said the pressure it too high was talking about the low pressure. It appears that the pressures are equalized which almost always is indicative of either a bad compressor(not pumping)or a bad reversing valve. Only a competent tech familiar with heat pumps at the scene can decipher which it is. They can measure the different temperatures at the reversing valve and that should lead them to the answer. It doesn't sound like either of these guys really knew their beans.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 07:03 PM
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I agree and we can't get much more technical that what we have already eluded to due to forum rules about refrigerant repairs. I guess you could choose the cheapest quote but before you agree to the repair you should demand a guarantee in writing that it will fix the problem or that they will fix the problem at no charge to you beyond the original quote. This may force them to send a more qualified tech. Not being there makes it hard for us to know and can't say how good of a tech was actually sent out. Unfortunately, you are on your own in this decision.
 
 

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