New roof = not cooling properly?


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Old 05-20-13, 04:38 AM
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New roof = not cooling properly?

Let me start by saying that I am new to this forum. Thank you in advance for your patience as I learn how this works.

Here is my problem:
I live in an apartment in Tampa, FL. We had a leaky roof for nearly a year It leaked off and on for a year, attempts were made to repair many times, finally the roof was replaced...the problem (I think) is that the reddish shingles were replaced with black shingles. The A/C stopped being able to cool more than a couple of degrees. The complex replaced the entire system while trying to rectify this problem...upgrading to a bit bigger system in the process. Still, when it is 85 outside, it is 84-85 inside. Important: We have vaulted ceilings with no insulation...the peak is about 18 feet...we have a 3 1/2 ton unit (Goodman) and there is about a 17 degree differential between the air going into the unit and that coming out. The small (high pressure?) line feel like it is room temp...it doesn't get warm...the complex has checked this out and now says it is cooling fine. I have told them that it is not fine when the unit runs 12+ hours straight and cannot cool...we love this location and apartment in spite of everything (and moving costs $$$), so knowing the problem and fixing it would be the best solution. If not, we will have to move...1500 sq feet...things I have read online before coming here...it could be: improperly filled refrigerant, fan not set to high speed.

The complex says the engineer who approved the plan tells them that the difference in color of shingles makes no difference. I have neighbors on each side of me...one has the exact same problem and the other has A/C working well...we all have new units that are bigger/better than in the past. (In the past the A/C had NO trouble cooling our home.

Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. (I already know to move, get a lawyer, etc) Ideally we can make a suggestion to the complex to fix the problem and we can live here happily ever after...or at least until the next big problem. Thank you.
 
  #2  
Old 05-20-13, 05:51 AM
J
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As far as the roof goes, black is the last color I would have chosen for your area.
That's roofing 10, dark colors absorb heat light colors reflect it.
The type of ceilings you have I would say are the most likly to be not insulated correctly, and not vented at all or not enough venting.
They made a huge solor panel heat sink by going with a dark color.
Being a layman on HVAC I'd ask the landlord permission to hire a third party HVAC company to come check this out at your expence and come up with a written report on there findings.
They can do a load calulation and run some test to see if it was sized correctly and is running right.
I can see where just changing the roofing in this case would throw off all the orginal sizing requirements.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 06:17 AM
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I confess to not being a HVAC pro as well, but the lack of insulation and the coincidence of this problem arriving right after a new roof need to be answered.

Does the unit have roof venting, soffit vents, ridge vent, or other? One problem that all too often happens is the roofers end up covering the ridge vent. If you have a ridge vent and you can get into the attic, it is easy to inspect or test. An incense stick should easily vent up and out. While up there take a look at the soffit area to be sure there is space for cooler ait to flow in.

As for the color of the shingles, red to black might increase the roof temperature, but not an enormous amount. I'm guessing the red would have been rather hot before. A shame they didn't take this opportunity to install the proper shingles, they would have helped.

Unfortunately, if there really is no insulation, even proper venting will only make a small difference. Vaulted ceilings with no insulation will quickly transfer that heat right to the drywall and into your home. Ceiling insulation is the number one fix and with a vaulted ceiling the need is even greater.

The 17 temperature differential sounds a bit low, but may depend upon where you are measuring it??

Bud
 
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Old 05-20-13, 06:26 AM
J
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Bud it sounds like there was red terra cotta tiles on the roof before and they changed it to black shingles.
A huge differance in the propertys of the two differant styles of roofing.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 06:37 AM
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I do forget those southern states are located on a different planet . He did call them reddish shingles so we will see if he confirms tiles or asphalt.

If tiles, do they create a ridge vent in some way or just no insulation and no venting?

Bud
 
 

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