Help cooling home office


  #1  
Old 05-30-13, 12:18 PM
J
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Help cooling home office

We recently moved into a new (to us) home and I work from home at least 2-3 days a week. My office is located in an upstairs bedroom. In order to keep the kids out and minimize distractions, I typically work with the door closed and have found that with warmer weather, my office gets hot pretty quickly.

There are 2 vents and 1 return vent in the room and the air filter is new.

The upstairs is served by one heat pump and the thermostat is in the bonus room (not my office).

I am trying to decide on the best course of action. A couple things I have been considering:

1. Replacing the thermostat with one that has a remote sensor that I can put in my office.

2. Buying a portable A/C unit for my office that I can run just when I am actually in there working.

I would appreciate any input on whether one of these would be my best option, or if I should consider something else.
 
  #2  
Old 05-30-13, 01:09 PM
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The remote thermostat sounds like a good plan, though that may mean that the other rooms get pretty cold.

The cheap portables are very inefficient and an eyesore IMO.

Unless you consider it too ugly...if the room stays cool with the door open...I'd consider putting a grill on both sides of the door. That would be the cheapest option, even if you had to replace the door slab later on down the line.

Odd that it doesn't stay balanced since you have a return in there. Guess they weren't sized correctly?
 
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Old 05-30-13, 01:39 PM
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You could try having the circulation fan for the upstairs heat pump stay on continuously. I had to do that with my office building to stabilize the individual office temperatures since the thermostat is in the hallway and it's worked quite well.

Another option is to get decorative grates. Like Gunguy mentions but don't put them in the door. Put them in the wall between your office and hall or in the wall above the door. Since most interior walls are hollow you find a wall cavity and put one grate on the hall side and the other on the office side. Place them at different elevations so there is no sight path through them and it offers some sound barrier. If you use grates that can be opened and closed it gives you further control over the airflow.
 
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Old 05-30-13, 01:55 PM
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Rather than a remote sensing thermostat I would suggest a wireless thermostat that you could easily move to the area where you want a controlled temperature. There would likely be a terminal at the present location of the thermostat (easiest) and then a separate thermostat unit that you would take into the office area when working and then return it to the location where the original thermostat is (assuming it normally is fine) when not working in the office.

Remote sensing (not wireless) thermostats are mainly used when the adjustment feature needs to be separate from the controlled location. Normally done to keep tenants from adjusting the thermostats.
 
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Old 05-30-13, 02:03 PM
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Oops...I meant the type 'stat that Furd describes. And the only reason I said grilles in the door is that it's normally easier to replace a typical door than to have someone repair the sheetrock and match the texture, repaint the entire wall, etc.
 
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Old 05-30-13, 06:03 PM
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Thanks for the feedback. I'm not too familiar with the difference between the 2 types of thermostats mentioned. Would you mind giving an example of the wireless kind that you recommend?
 
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Old 05-30-13, 06:11 PM
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I wireless stat could be a very good solution, but it will be costly for a good thermostat that has that capability. We can help you install it if you choose to go that route.
 
 

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