Need Help Identifying Wires on Fan Motor

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Old 07-07-13, 03:12 PM
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Need Help Identifying Wires on Fan Motor

I have a 1992 vintage YORK Air Conditioner with an Emerson Fan Motor. There is one pair of unidentified wires, with join connectors, coming out of the motor and going back into it.

The Emerson Fan Motor has the following specs:

EMERSON Model K55HXSRD-4515 HP 1/4
Volt 208-230
R.P.M. 825
HZ 60 AMP 2.0 PH1

This unit was last serviced in 2005. This 2005 service was provided through a Home Warranty company, AHS. They dispatched a contractor to come to the house and get the unit functioning properly. I no longer have AHS or any Home Warranty..

The exposed wires running through the fan grate were not there prior to servicing in 2005. The plastic insulation on the join connectors is starting to deteriorate. It looks like kind of a hack-job fix, that was done by the AC service man that worked on the fan motor back in 2005.

I was not home when the work was done, and don't remember if I ever found out what the guy did to the fan motor. I had forgotten about the whole thing for several years, but now I see it is deteriorating and I want to "fix" it properly..

The service man's only notation about the servicing was that the condensate drain line was clogged and that he unclogged it, probably with a wet vac. No mention was ever made as to what he actually did to the fan motor. He was called to the house by the person who was then living in it with me, because the unit had stopped blowing cool air, and was no longer cooling the house. After he left and did whatever he did, it has been working ever since..

The unit is still operating and cooling the house, but I don't like what I see with that wiring sticking out of the fan motor and running through the grate.

Does anyone know what the purpose of that wiring is, and what the guy may have been doing with the join connectors? Is this simply a case of trying to splice wires, without removing the fan or the grate? Any recommendations on how to fix this properly? It just looks to me like it was a temporary solution to whatever the problem was..

I have attached some photos showing the wires.









Full AC Unit shown Below:

 
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Old 07-07-13, 03:35 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

The connection method is perfectly acceptable but the wiring should have been tied up under the grate so that busy fingers couldn't contact the 240v fan wiring.
 
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Old 07-07-13, 04:11 PM
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Thanks for the reply PJmax!

Those wires are carrying 240V, and they are out in the open like that!?

Why are those wires even there in the first place? Shouldn't all the wiring pass through the metal tube, running from the motor to the electrical compartment, where the contactor and capacitor/capacitors are located?

I don't understand why the same pair of wires are running outside of the motor, are joined by connectors (outside of the motor), and then running back inside it..

Those join connectors are starting to crack and have some holes in them. The heat has really deteriorated the connector insulators. They could also short out on the metal fan grate, if they make metal to metal contact with the grate.
 
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Old 07-07-13, 05:32 PM
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Actually only one side of the line and a sign of laziness on the techs part. You got a universal motor instead of OEM. Nothing wrong with that, but there is no attention to detail by the installer. A little late to complain now, but I'd get it fixed. Less than a 5 minute job for someone that knows what they are doing.
 
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Old 07-07-13, 07:58 PM
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no biggy

This is a replacement motor, what you usually see is a couple zip ties and black tape and its done UNDER the grille not above... This connector is used to reverse the rotation of the motor. If you reverse the connectors it will spin the other way. They wont fit inside the tube provided. Your only concern is preventing the blade from hitting the wires. If it burns out today, you still got your moneys worth...
 
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Old 07-07-13, 08:03 PM
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concern

I would be more concerned with the loose acorn nuts that hold the motor in place.............
 
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Old 07-07-13, 08:43 PM
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I think they have nuts to hold it in place and just put the cap nuts on for cosmetic purposes. I wish I had a camera with me for every cut corner I have seen over the years.
 
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Old 07-07-13, 08:44 PM
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Thank you, hvac01453. I had actually discovered what the wires are a few minutes before you made your two posts. A video I found on Youtube, identified them as direction changing wires for the fan rotation.

The sun is destroying the insulators on the wire connectors.. I really think new connectors should be installed on the wires, then hang them under the grate and away from the fan blades. I would think plastic zip ties would melt under the scorching Phoenix sun.. Not sure what else to use though..

Regarding the acorn nuts, there are a second set of nuts holding the fan in place on the mounting studs, beneath the acorn nuts. I did find it odd that the acorn nuts were sticking up on the end of the mounting studs. I suppose the studs should have been cut down, to shorten their length. Bottom line is, whoever installed the fan motor, did a lousy job doing it..

A recent capacitor failure on my friends AC unit (on July 4th, 3 days ago), during a party, caused me to inspect my unit at my home.. Cost him $250 to replace the capacitor on a holiday service call to get the temperature inside the house down from 91 degrees. It had a dual capacitor unit, and the compressor side of it failed, leaving the fan motor running, with the compressor refusing to run. It was a Mars 2 dual capacitor and it was only 2 years old.. I was told Mars capacitors are made in China, like most other junk.
 
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Old 07-08-13, 06:20 PM
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The capacitor

He likely installed a Turbo 200 multi tap capacitor. This gives the tech the ability to replace dual caps under a variety of microfarad ratings, using this one cap with multiple posts and jumpers. Our cost I think is about 50-80 dollars not including markup. Plus I think its made in USA.
I mean you only have so much room in that truck. If he had to do this after hours, It will normally cost about $100.00 to access the supply house. Who do you think pays this???
It would have been a lot cheaper to wait till Monday or whenever they could get there... Most of this is due to power demand and the electric company is browning out the supply power...so instead of 120V or 208V you might be only getting 108V or 200V for double CB circuits...as voltage goes down, amperage goes up.... this is what kills electrical equipment, and they begin to run hotter and hotter.
 
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