Replaced Capacitor, A/C cooled for a few hours, then no cool air...

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Old 07-20-13, 06:49 PM
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Replaced Capacitor, A/C cooled for a few hours, then no cool air...

Hello everyone, first post ever... Going to start fixing things myself around here... Hopefully I can eventually be a semi jack of all trades... Lol Hardly...

I'm going to make this as brief as possible... I own a Goodman ckl60-1 central air system... A few days ago, the house began to get warm and I noticed the lights in the house kept dimming every so often, like when the hot tub begins to circulate. Went outside and noticed that the outside ac system was not running, but there was a slight hum coming from the fan motor and it was hot. Did a little research online and decided to replace the capacitor. I removed the capacitor and after a long day, I was finally able to find a supply store willing to work with me. Turns out I needed a 60+5 440 capacitor, however they did not have one in stock, so I purchased a universal one, which they rigged up with jump cables to bring it to the required specs. I showed them a pic of the old cap and how it was wired, they then labeled the new cap, so as to properly rewire. I forgot to mention, the old cap was swollen at the top and clearly bad. I came home, reattached the cap, per the wire diagram they drew. I then buttoned everything back up and ran the power... Wallah, fan clicked on, system back up and running. Ran in the house, closed all the windows and the house began to cool... Got as low as 74 before the house started getting warm again... This time around, the outside ac unit is running as designed. The inside fan motor is working, just look air coming in. I tried shutting the system down and hosing off the unit outside... Still nothing. Can anyone think of what is being missed, or what I can do?

Thanks and again, it's a pleasure to be a part of this community.

Mike
 
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Old 07-20-13, 08:14 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

The outside unit is comprised of two electrical parts.....a condensor fan and a compressor.
The fan may still have been running but was the compressor running ?

It should be blowing fairly warm/hot air when working normally.
 
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Old 07-21-13, 07:34 AM
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Hi there and thank you...

At some point after I replaced the capacitor, the air indoors was cool and the air being blown from the condenser fan was warm. Sometime later, the air indoors became warm and the air flowing from the condensing fan was cool, not warm.

I have a few questions:

1. Is it possible the capacitor is damaged and or not suffice in some way?

2. Would low freon cause the symptoms above? It was recharged last summer, and we have short summers.

Thanks,

Mike
 
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Old 07-21-13, 08:42 AM
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It's possible that the system is low on refrigerant, especially considering that you had to add refrigerant last year. This indicates that there is a leak somewhere. After you replaced the capacitor, when the house began to warm up again, did you notice reduced airflow from the vents in the house? If so, this is an indication that your evaporator coil may be freezing up. This is usually caused by either reduced airflow (dirty air filter), or low refrigerant.

Also, a warning. You mentioned that you hosed off the outside unit. You do need to do that to clean the condensor coils. However, the proper way to do it is to turn off the power, remove the fan assembly from the top of the unit, and spray water through the coils from the inside (water ends up outside). This "reverse flush" gets more dirt out since the water flow is in the opposite direction of the normal airflow (fan pulls outside air through coils and expels it out the top). If you spray water from the outside (ends up inside the unit), you won't get as good a cleaning (you're driving the dirt deeper into the fins), but more importantly, if you do it while the compressor is hot (particularly if it's overheated to begin with), you run the risk of cracking the compressor housing due to thermal shock (cold water against hot metal).
 
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Old 07-21-13, 09:41 AM
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Well, after a half hour, I noticed that the flow of air was low, and I really wanted to get the house cool asap, so I removed the filter, which increased the flow of air by 50%... So I'm guessing the coils didn't freeze that quick... The systems been off for over 15 hrs, I just fired it back up and the air is still warm...

Does low freon prevent the compressor from running? In other words, shouldn't the air being pushed out of the condenser fan still be warm?

Thanks - I saw that in a few tutorials on cleaning the system, however it was dark, and I was reaching...

Thanks all!
 
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Old 07-21-13, 10:16 AM
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Some A/C systems have a low pressure switch which will prevent the compressor from turning on if the system pressure drops too low. I don't know if your system has a low pressure switch or not. If you go outside, do you hear the compressor running? Compressors usually make a distinctive sound that is quite different from just the condensor fan noise. If the compressor isn't running (just the condensor fan at the top of the outside unit), it's possible that you didn't wire up the capacitors correctly. I don't know what instructions they gave you, however if they gave you several small capacitors to makeup the required capacitance, they need to be wired in parallel. As an example, two 1uf caps wired in parallel will give 2uf. Two 1uf caps wired in series will give 0.5uf.
 
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Old 07-21-13, 12:29 PM
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As to the capacitor, the jump wires were slightly off from where they were supposed to be, per the provided diagram (in the box) in order to achieve the correct 60+5 setting. He (the supply store guy, originally set the jump wires) also had me attaching the yellow (herm) to the 10mfd instead of the 25mfd per the instructions.

After rearranging those, rebooted the system, fan fires up, so sign of the compressor... Air is still warm inside, but I cannot hear the compressor kick on.

Is anyone familiar with this model:

Ckl60-1
0406762326

I just need to know, is this compressor resettable... Or does it have a built in safety, because it did work yesterday and I remember hearing the sou d it makes, vs now I don't hear anything...

Thanks,

Mike



Is anyone familiar with this model:

Clk60-1
0406762326
 
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Old 07-21-13, 01:03 PM
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Most motors (compressor & fan) have a thermal cutoff. If the motor gets overheats, the thermal cutoff opens, cutting power to the motor so it doesn't burn out. Usually, the thermal cutoffs automatically reset themselves once the motor has cooled off. If you have an ohmmeter, you could check the resistance of the compressor windings. Be sure to turn off the power before doing so, and disconnect the wires from the compressor. While I don't know what the exact resistance should be, I would expect something in the range of 5-10 ohms.
 
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Old 07-21-13, 04:12 PM
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no, your compressor is not resettable by way of a manual switch on your goodman unit. It is likely a copeland compressor. If your run water over it or pack ice around it it can greatly reduce the automatic reset time. You need to measure the resistance of the windings to prove that the internal thermal overload switch is open. Post a picture of your capacitor and wiring.
 
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Old 07-21-13, 08:43 PM
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This picture was taken before I started the system for the first time after the capacitor was replaced. Can you see that ground wire with the melted plastic around it? Well, as I stated before, the system worked soon after I fired it up. Tonight, I went back out to take a look, and hat same wire was sheered off... The wire head was still attached, but the wire looked like it broke off, not too far from the wire head. Could this be the reason why the compressor is not kicking on?

What I plan to do tomorrow:

1. Buy another capacitor, one that is 60+5 440, which is not jumped.

2. Consult on replacing that wire and reattaching.

Guys, thanks for all of the help. I feel we're getting closer to a solution.
 
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Old 07-21-13, 08:47 PM
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The common wire for the compressor is melted on the top left of the contactor. ( common on that goodman unit). I do not like turbo type capacitors. Get the correct capacitor and don;t use the universal.
 
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Old 07-22-13, 12:01 PM
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Hvactechfw - What's the easy fix here... Can I reattache, or is it more complicated? I will get a new cap tdy... Hopefully, I can return the turbo...

IM me if you prefer... Tnx!
 
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