Goodman outside A/C unit will not turn on

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  #1  
Old 09-08-13, 04:57 PM
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Goodman outside A/C unit will not turn on

Hello,
I have a outside Goodman A/c unit that does not turn on (No fan or compressor)

It makes one click out of the contactor when the thermostat in the house is turned on.

Does that mean the contactor is bad and is there a way to test it?
The capacitor does not look bulged?

Any help would be greatly appreciated, my elderly parents are overheating without any A/C!!!
 
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  #2  
Old 09-08-13, 05:21 PM
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Push the contactor button in (use an insulated tool/wood stick), if that starts your AC, then the contactor is bad, or you may have other problem, like transformer, broken wire, etc......If that does not start your AC, then you may have other problem, like capacitor, etc..
 
  #3  
Old 09-08-13, 05:30 PM
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I did not see any contactor button?

The contactor part number is:
CR453CB3HBAFG
B13603-21
 
  #4  
Old 09-08-13, 05:59 PM
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There is probably a cover in place held on by a small screw that is there to keep insects, spiders and etc. from getting in. Remove the cover to expose the "plunger" to carefully push it in.
 

Last edited by firedawgsatx; 09-08-13 at 07:08 PM.
  #5  
Old 09-08-13, 06:15 PM
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Thank you!
I am going to drive over to my parents house and try your test.
I will post the results of the test.
 
  #6  
Old 09-08-13, 07:13 PM
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Hello,

I just tested the contactor...I did not have to push the test button in because when we turned on the A/C unit the contactor energized and pulled the test button in. Guessing the contactor is OK.
What should I check next??? The capaciator. How would I test it?
Thank you
 
  #7  
Old 09-08-13, 07:20 PM
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Just because the contactor pulls in does not mean it is good. You need to check that you have 240V going into the contactor and 240V going out of the contactor when the thermostat is calling for cooling. To test the capacitor you need a voltmeter that can test for capacitance. Do you have a voltmeter? The fact that you see it pulling in is a pretty good indication you have 24VAC going to the side terminals of the contactor. I would suggest you verify it. Use extreme caution when doing these tests due to high voltage!
 
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Old 09-08-13, 07:30 PM
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Hello,

I test it right now!!!
 
  #9  
Old 09-08-13, 07:34 PM
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You can do a visual inspection of the run capacitor. A classic sign of a bad run capacitor is if the top is bulging or has oil leaking from it. That is not always true but it is in a lot of cases. Going back, you said the capacitor pulled in. When you pushed the "plunger" did the fan and the compressor start?
 
  #10  
Old 09-08-13, 07:35 PM
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Hello,

With my vott meter I have zero when hooked up between L1 and L2 but if I hook up to L1 and ground I get 124 volts the same with L2, T1 and T2 as long as one volt meter lead is on ground???

Thanks
 
  #11  
Old 09-08-13, 07:38 PM
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I used a set of chop sticks to push in the plunger and the fan and compressor did not come on
 
  #12  
Old 09-08-13, 07:40 PM
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Do not test to ground. Place one lead on L1 and one lead on L2. Do the same for T1 and T2. Make sure the thermostat is turned down all the way so it is calling for cooling. If the contactor is pulling in you should get 240V between L1 and L2 and between T1 and T2 and 24VAC between the two side terminals. Did you flip the breaker on and off to the unit?
 
  #13  
Old 09-08-13, 07:48 PM
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Hello,

I flipped the breakers. Any ideas why am I not getting voltage between L1 and L2 and T1 and T2??? Yet each pole is hot (in my very limited ac voltage knowledge)
 
  #14  
Old 09-08-13, 07:49 PM
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Sounds like a bad contactor. A contactor is just a switch.
 
  #15  
Old 09-08-13, 07:53 PM
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Go ahead and measure between L1 and T1 and L2 and L2 and post your readings.
 
  #16  
Old 09-08-13, 07:57 PM
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Hello

I forgot to mention when the system is energized there is a very slight humming or vibration coming from possibly the contactor?
 
  #17  
Old 09-08-13, 08:00 PM
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Did you do the last test I posted?
 
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Old 09-08-13, 08:02 PM
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Hello I just sas the last post...will run the test!
 
  #19  
Old 09-08-13, 08:06 PM
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Hello,
Zero volts between L1 and T1 and zero volts between L2 and T2.
 
  #20  
Old 09-08-13, 08:09 PM
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Ok. That is what that test should read.
 
  #21  
Old 09-08-13, 08:10 PM
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I am using a freebee Harbor Freight volt meter that I might not know how to work correctly because how can each pole have 124 volts but zero across the poles???
 
  #22  
Old 09-08-13, 08:17 PM
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Ok, let's do another test. This time you will have to shut your power off to the outside unit and turn the thermostat to off. Then pull the two 24V wires off the sides of the contactor. Turn your voltmeter to the ohms setting. It looks like an upside down horseshoe. Then place one of your voltmeter leads on the 24V terminal on the left side of the contactor and the other lead on the right side of the contactor and post the reading.
 
  #23  
Old 09-08-13, 08:21 PM
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Hello,
I will wait patiently!
P.S. Sorry I posted the post about Harbor freight before I saw your post about it being OK.
 
  #24  
Old 09-08-13, 08:27 PM
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With the ohm meter set to the 20K scale it reads .02
When the power for the thermostat is turn on it energizes the contactor and pulls the test button in
 
  #25  
Old 09-08-13, 08:32 PM
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Set the ohms to the lowest scale. Does your meter have a "beep" function for continuity? Set the voltmeter to the continuity setting. Place the probes on the same two 24V terminals and let me know the reading.
 
  #26  
Old 09-08-13, 08:37 PM
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The meter does not have beep function. I cannot remember which is the lowest scale...my meter has 2000k 200k 20k 2000 and 200
Set on the 200 scale it read 11.6
Did i have the correct scale???
 
  #27  
Old 09-08-13, 08:41 PM
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Yes. that is the correct scale. Ok, that test shows the contactor coil is good (just wanted to verify). Verify you had your voltmeter set to 600 VAC when you tested the L1 and L2.
 
  #28  
Old 09-08-13, 08:45 PM
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Hello,

Yes I had the volt meter set to the 750 ACV scale
 
  #29  
Old 09-08-13, 08:54 PM
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You will need to check the breaker to see if you have one side bad. 120 to ground is feedback voltage. Need to have 240 volts between L1 and L2. Do you have a disconnect located near your outside unit? If so, is it the type that has fuses or the type that you pull out?
 
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Old 09-08-13, 08:56 PM
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Any tips on how to go about checking the breaker?
 
  #31  
Old 09-08-13, 09:00 PM
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It is pretty dangerous to do so if you are not familiar with it. Do you have a disconnect next to your outside unit?
 
  #32  
Old 09-08-13, 09:03 PM
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There is a box mounted on the wall next to the A/C unit that has big flip switch breaker in it
 
  #33  
Old 09-08-13, 09:07 PM
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Ok. That is where you would need to test the breaker. To do so you would have to remove the metal plate that covers the breaker. It is dangerous because the power going into the breaker will be "hot" while doing the tests. You can turn off the main breaker that feeds the disconnect while you remove the access panel. Once you get the access panel off you will flip the main breaker back on and carefully place your voltmeter on the two wires that go into the breaker. Set your meter to 600VAC if you have it or 750VAC, I'll see if I can find a photo.
 
  #34  
Old 09-08-13, 09:16 PM
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Hello,

Do you mind if we finish the testing tomorrow early evening? Because of the danger I would perfer to do these test when it is light outside.
I so much appreciate all of your help!!! You are a good man!

I am worried about my parents in this HOT house, hopefully I can figure it out tomorrow.

Thank you,
Ken
 
  #35  
Old 09-08-13, 09:18 PM
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Sure that is no problem. Safety first always. I am going to send you a PM.
 
  #36  
Old 09-09-13, 06:22 PM
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All you want to know is if you have power on L1 & L2 (also T1 & T2) or not. Be careful when you do all these tests, since you probably stand on the ground which is dangerous. Can I suggest a simple & save way to test this? Go get a electricity (power) detector, cost $12 at Wal-Mart or Home depot, so you don't have to do all these dangerous work. use that detector, he will beep you if he finds power on the wire. you don't even have to touch the wire. You may not know if it is 120 or 240, but at least you know something is there or not.
 
  #37  
Old 09-09-13, 06:29 PM
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clocert.....

The OP has already established that he has 120 VAC on one leg.
Therefore a non contact tester will not help him in his repair at this point.
 
  #38  
Old 09-09-13, 06:54 PM
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The OP has already established that he has 120 VAC on one leg.
Since it appears he lost one 120V leg my bet is still on a bad breaker at the main panel or disconnect. I'm pretty sure he is getting feedback voltage through the contactor coil. Even though the regular contributors know the OP's issue is the incoming voltage to L1 and L2, I like to have newbies do some hands-on tests to become familiar with the different parts and controls on the system to prepare them for future issues.
 

Last edited by firedawgsatx; 09-09-13 at 07:09 PM.
  #39  
Old 09-09-13, 08:24 PM
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Problem solved. Thanks to the help of firedawgsatx!!!
In the disconnect there are two fuses, one was bad. A quick trip to the hardware store and the system is nice and cold.

On a seperate issue it seems like the in house blower fan barely flows much air out the registers? I could not see a filter?

Thank you all for your help. What a great site!!!
 
  #40  
Old 09-10-13, 07:02 AM
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Is the air handler installed in the attic? If so, check behind the air return grille(s) to see if a filter is installed there. Is this a variable speed blower fan? If a filter is not installed at all then more than likely the evaporator coil is stopped up and the air can not flow through properly. If you can't find a filter then it means it has never been changed (if there is in fact one somewhere). I would start by looking at the coil in the air handler. There is usually a filter access panel where the return air duct(s) comes into the air handler. If you will post the name/model number of the air handler perhaps we can locate the standard filter location.

I have attached a photo of where you might look for the filter.
 
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