AC condensation problem

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  #1  
Old 10-29-13, 01:40 PM
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AC condensation problem

I moved into my home some time early last year. During the summer i noticed dipping sound i didn't have time to check it out. But now i have time to try to fix it. I wend down into the craw space to see where the dripping was coming from. I noticed red/brownish streak marks coming down the AC Unit. The AC unit has condensate drain line but i don't believe it is working correctly. The drain line comes from the AC Unit down to the craw space then goes out side, but the drain line from the Ac Unit goes upward to outside. I am not an expert but i don't believe the drain pip is draining because it's going upward. I have attached some pictures.

How do i replace this drain pip correctly?
Any info would be great.

Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-29-13, 02:56 PM
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Even though its pitched upward which is SO incorrect it would still eventually drain once it filled up, BUT....that would clog extremely easily. That looks like a lot of work to make that right, especially if that concrete foundation is below grade. You made need to drill through the beams and re route the drain so that it is pitched correctly, or you can just let it drain into the crawlspace....
 
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Old 10-29-13, 03:26 PM
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um.. think drilling a 3/4" hole through the floor joists might work. Although i would have to put the drain pip over the air ducts.

Would i need a p-trap? Would i need a Vent-T after the P-trap?
If i do where would these go?

It would be hard to put a Vent-T since the drain pipe would be really close to the craw space ceiling.

Is there certain restrictions for drilling holes in floor joists?

Thanks for the reply.
 
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Old 10-31-13, 12:55 PM
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NO WAY DO NOT DRILL IN TO BEAM That is jack leg and against code!!!!!! Yes you need a trap. If you cant get fall on it add a pump..
 
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Old 10-31-13, 12:58 PM
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on a side note it looks like you have mold on the decking and beams.. Hard to tell from pic
 
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Old 11-05-13, 10:24 AM
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I thought it was mold as well but it's some type of paint. wired.

How would i add a pump and how would I install it?
 
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Old 11-06-13, 11:35 AM
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There is a lot of information on cutting holes in a floor joist for pluming. From what i read you pretty much have to stay 2 inches from the edge of the joist.
How to Drill Through Floor Joists: The Family Handyman


If i can install a AC condensate pump first I would like to go that rout.
Does anyone have any diagrams on how to install on?
 
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Old 11-06-13, 12:53 PM
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I have a condensate pump in my basement that handles the condensate from both the A/C and my high efficiency furnace. The setup is actually pretty simple. Both the furnace and A/C drains meet (a "T") and then a single pipe (PVC plastic) goes down into the condensate pump which is sitting on the basement floor next to the furnace. There is a float in the condensate pump, and when the water level reaches a certain level, the float trips a switch which turns on the pump. The pump evacuates the water from its reservoir through clear plastic tubing which runs up and into the washing machine drain pipe. When the pump is nearly empty, the float drops and turns off the pump. The pump remains off until the reservoir is nearly full and then the pump turns on again.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 09:41 AM
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my AC/ Furnace is inside a closet in my house with part of the AC/furnace going into the craw space. I am not sure where to install the pump at, there isn't much room in the closet. I guess i could try to fit it in. But is there certain lengths that the in and out pip have to be from the AC/Furnace to the pump?

I have attached a pic of what i am thinking of doing does this look ok? could i draw power for the pump from the AC/Furnace power box?

Or would it be best to install the pump in the craw space under next to the AC/Furnace unit?

Any suggestions would be great.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 10:51 AM
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I would suggest moving the pump from where you have it marked (left of black, insulated pipe) to the right of the insulated pipe. That way you're not blocking the air vent. I suspect it will fit to the right of the pipe. After plumbing the condensate lines into the pump, all you need to do is to find a place to pump the condensate into. As I mentioned, I have mine pumping into my washing machine drain pipe. While I suspect there is a maximum length for the output (drain) line, I think it's pretty long. As long as most of the drain line is horizontal and you're not having to pump the condensate a large vertical distance, you should be good. FWIW, my drain line (where it empties into the washing machine drain) is at least 6 feet above the top of the pump.

The pump doesn't draw much current. You should have no problem connecting it to the furnace AC power.
 
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Old 11-07-13, 12:53 PM
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I don't think moving it to the right would be a good choice because the power to the AC/Furnace enters through the floor to the power switch.
 
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Old 11-28-13, 01:42 AM
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Thinking a little "outside the box", my first thought after seeing your picture of the upward sloping pipe was that mine used to look like that. I was fortunate though as I just needed to add some additional hangers to get the pipe sloped all the way to the outside wall. Next thought: can the pipe be rerouted to another outside wall such that you can get it to slope all the way. If not, what about cutting it where is comes down vertically, probably above the round duct in the photo, reconnecting with 90 degree bend, then sloping it through holes in the floor joists. You already mentioned doing this. I don't know the rules for drilling in floor joints, but you have a pretty good idea after looking it up. In any event, adding metal straps under the holes should satisfy any requirement. The sump pump method is a non-starter to me: just one more thing to have to fix down the road. Just get the pipe sloped right and all you have to worry about is crud stopping up your drain line: happened to me this year. Got an AC guy out under warranty though, so no cost. He blew it out. Now I have a ToDo on my list scheduled for once a year to do it myself.
 
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