Checking Freon levels

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-14-14, 02:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Checking Freon levels

Being that I had tremendous help regarding my a/c unit, I figured I had to continue seeking help.

My upstairs unit is not blowing as cold as my downstairs unit. Is there anyway to check the Freon level using that tool that has the two gauges and probes?

Thanks in advance
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-14-14, 02:46 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,485
Received 28 Votes on 22 Posts
Yes, but...US Environmental Protection Agency rules prohibit an uncertified person from working with most refrigerants. Merely connecting the gauge set is considered to be working with the refrigerant. This forum does not allow any mention of of how to do such work.

BTW, Freon is a registered trade name of refrigerants manufactured by Dupont. Many other companies make refrigerants so the proper term is, refrigerant, not Freon.
 
  #3  
Old 05-14-14, 03:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry, I was unaware of this. Thank you for informing me of such.

But essentially that is the only way to check cool levels?
 
  #4  
Old 05-14-14, 03:36 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,706
Received 345 Votes on 323 Posts
Yes..... you need a set of gauges to check the refrigerant level.

An air handler in the attic will not get as cold as an air handler in the basement.
 
  #5  
Old 05-14-14, 03:49 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Is there a set of numbers that a "cool" a/c should be pumping out. I don't want to get the short end of the stick when I call a licensed a/c person to check my a/c juice.
 
  #6  
Old 05-14-14, 03:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,485
Received 28 Votes on 22 Posts
I don't know what you mean when you write, "check cool levels". Refrigerant level in residential systems is checked by means of pressures and temperatures in different parts of the system as well as the relative humidity and temperature of both the inside and outside air. It is a fine balancing point, takes precision equipment and a fair amount of skill. By comparison, checking the refrigerant level in large commercial systems is pretty much just looking at a level gauge.

There are many reasons why your upstairs system may not be blowing air as cold as the downstairs system, including the mere fact that the ductwork and air handler are located in the attic, just as PJ mentioned. Low refrigerant level is likely to be the least of the probable answers.
 
  #7  
Old 05-14-14, 03:55 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,706
Received 345 Votes on 323 Posts
Get an accurate thermometer and measure the air temperature directly as it enters the air handler and measure the temperature again where it leaves the air handler. Post your measurements.
 
  #8  
Old 05-14-14, 03:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Gotcha.. well that's way above my level of expertise. I appreciate the education.
 
  #9  
Old 05-15-14, 05:33 AM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 896
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Do as PJmax stated, you're looking for 15-20 degree temp split.
 
  #10  
Old 05-15-14, 06:49 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
ok, Ill have to locate the air handlers first. I hate not knowing the language. But then again, that's why I'm here seeking advice and help.

Ill post those temps. Thanks
 
  #11  
Old 05-15-14, 07:43 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
PJ... I know the air handler is the entire unit I have in my attic. But where do I measure. When I remove the bottom cover the mother board is exposed and directly above that is where the duct is connected?

Above that is where the coils are?

So where would I put the thermometer?

Thanks
 
  #12  
Old 05-15-14, 12:16 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 896
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Put the thermometer at the return air grill, then put it at the supply air grill. That's really all you need to do to see the basic temp split.
 
  #13  
Old 05-15-14, 09:59 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks Tom. Ill have to locate these grills first. I am assuming the return grill is the part of my unit where the air blows out of?..
 
  #14  
Old 05-15-14, 10:08 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,706
Received 345 Votes on 323 Posts
The grilles are in your house..... where the air enters and exits.

I usually drill two small holes near the air handler and use an electronic thermometer with remote probe.

You basically want to see the air temperature is that is entering the furnace and the air temperature as it is cooled and leaving the furnace. The difference between the two is called the split.
 
  #15  
Old 05-16-14, 05:30 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
thanks PJ... Sorry for the many questions that may seem easy to answer, but I really dont know which grilles you are referring to. I have several vents throughout my house and I have two (one down and upstairs) big square vents where my filters go and the air in my house gets suck up through there. Do i get the temp reading from these two areas or do I physically go into my attic and find the two areas where the air is being pumped into my house and suck back out.
 
  #16  
Old 05-16-14, 07:47 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,706
Received 345 Votes on 323 Posts
Pick one grill where the air gets drawn in (at the filter) and pick a register where the air comes out.

Ideally you would want to check at the unit but usually there aren't any useable openings to measure at.
 
  #17  
Old 05-16-14, 09:08 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ok apparently a regular thermometer doesnt work. The digital one will only ready LO when it gets below like 95 degrees. I guess that's good for what it's intended purpose is.

But, I did put the unit back on since it's been off for two days due to my downstairs unit going out due to switch box. (Thanks to you all)

I put the unit on fan (auto) and cool. The room temp. was 76 and I set the cool to 74. Approx. 15-20 mins later it shut off due to the room reaching the desired temp. Is there a possibility that since the downstairs unit was off, the heat from downstairs rose and made the top floor uncontrollable for that unit thus never cooling it down. To me it seems as if I may have placed to much stress on that unit.

Just a guess, but its working fine now. I got a trustworthy, reliable HVAC tech coming out next week to check for leaks and see if I need refrigerant.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: