Two hose portable A/C causing negative pressure

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-20-14, 01:51 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Two hose portable A/C causing negative pressure

Hi,
I have a old Danby premiere DPAC13009 dual hose portable A/C
I chose a dual hose system specifically not to create negative pressure in my apt
however, my A/C IS causing significant negative pressure, I can feel a draft when I open a window or door while the A/C is running

is it possible a dual hose sys cause negative pressure as it ages ?
or is there some less well made sys causes negative pressure (exhausting more air than intake) ?

Thank you
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-20-14, 03:28 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 12,933
Received 54 Votes on 47 Posts
Welcome to the forums!

So you feel no draft when the A/C is not running? I would think it has nothing to do with the A/C. Unless you have it on a "fresh" setting the two airs should never mix.
 
  #3  
Old 05-20-14, 05:08 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,682
Received 343 Votes on 321 Posts
You may have some negative air pressure with that unit but less then you would have with a single line system.
 
  #4  
Old 05-20-14, 05:16 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Texas, California
Posts: 1,460
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That draft is from your inside blower, depends on the location and direction of the unit.. Central air will have the same issue if it is close to the return register. But if you close all your windows, you won't have that problem. Because this is a 2 hose unit, you don't have to open the windows. (you have to if it is a single hose unit)
 
  #5  
Old 05-20-14, 08:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Tolyn Ironhand,
it's a old apartment, it has 2 constant exhausts that already causing negative pressure, but by blocking the 2 exhausts, the negative pressure is gone
but when I turn on the A/C, the negative pressure is back, which is a problem because it's drawing neighbor's cigaret smoke into my unite
 
  #6  
Old 05-20-14, 08:40 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Clocert,
I feel the inward draft in the living room, or at my door, although my A/C is in my room, so I don't think it's the placement of the A/C
 
  #7  
Old 05-20-14, 08:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
PJmax,
so two hose unit can still cause negative pressure...
do window unite guarantee not causing negative pressure ?
I guess ductless split systems will not cause negative pressure for sure, but those are too expensive...
 
  #8  
Old 05-20-14, 09:29 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,682
Received 343 Votes on 321 Posts
The unit draws air in from the easiest place. If you had the room sealed off it would have no choice but to draw in from the intake line.

Most window units don't cause negative pressure. Some do have an exhaust feature which, of course, would draw air out of the room if activated.
 
  #9  
Old 05-20-14, 11:44 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Texas, California
Posts: 1,460
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I don't see the difference between the window unit and portable unit. If you put the portable unit on the window (half way out) and put both hoses outside, then it becomes a window unit. The 2 hoses are for condensing coil, they should be separated from the inside blower or the air inside the room.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: