A/C Blower not blowing very hard

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  #1  
Old 06-08-15, 02:23 PM
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A/C Blower not blowing very hard

Hi all,

I live in this super old, really big house that has a blower from the 80's in the attic. Every year we have trouble with the A/C at the start of summer, and every year we try and band aid what we can to try and eek out another year without having to drop the big bucks on a new system. This year on one of the first really hot days I walked into the house and noticed how humid it was. It wasn't as hot as outside, but it was warm, so I checked the thermostat and lo and behold it was indicating an inside temp of 80 but was set at 74.

The first thing I did was go to my dining room where I can check the status of the air coming out of the vents the easiest as the vents are at the top of the walls. The air coming out of the vents was cold, and the metal vent itself was chilled, but the air wasn't blowing very hard. So I looked at my blinds that usually blow around a bit due to the air coming out of the vents and they were still.

I checked the filters, there are 2 that I change on a regular basis and both seemed ok, and I know I've changed them within the last 60 days. So I turned the A/C off for 20 minutes and then turned it back on. It didn't seem to do much but I came home later and the house was at 75.

It's still not blowing hard, but if I turn the air down in the morning it doesn't get up to 80 (just 77 or so)

What do you think it might be? I think we may have a refrigerant leak, so I don't know if this could be the culprit or not. I have a guy (a friend of a friend) coming to look at it later this week, but it would be nice to get something done before then.

Thanks!
K~
 
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  #2  
Old 06-08-15, 02:36 PM
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2 filters? Are they side by side or are they stacked. Hard to describe what I'm asking.
 
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Old 06-08-15, 02:50 PM
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If your system is low on refrigerant, the evaporator coil could be partially or fully freezing up, thus causing reduced airflow. To determine if that is the cause, you would need to turn the A/C OFF for approximately 24 hours to let any ice that may have formed to melt. Then turn the A/C back on and feel the airflow. If the airflow feels stronger (normal), then the evaporator is most likely icing up due to low refrigerant. If the airflow is still low, then you have a different problem. Assuming that the filters aren't dirty or blocked, it's possible that the evaporator coil is dirty and is impeding the airflow.
 
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Old 06-08-15, 10:47 PM
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Hey, interesting, we are in the same boat. weird

I'm in Texas too and having the same problem in my apartment. Two maintenance men said there's no problem since the vent is blowing cold air when right in front of it, but as you stated, the blinds and things aren't moving. I can't feel any air breeze as usually I could and the closer I get to the vents, the more I smell this annoying smell like staleness or something. My ACU-RITE is saying I have high humidity (ranging from 62 to 69ish.)

About three weeks ago, I had a leak from the bathroom ceiling which the maintenance guy said it was leaking Freon. HOWEVER, now he is acting like everything is fine even though it isn't. I'm thinking like you--hat is the problem.

PLEASE do share once your friend figure out what's going on!
 
  #5  
Old 06-09-15, 08:47 AM
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Neither. One is upstairs and one is downstairs. They both pull air through when the air is on.
 
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Old 06-09-15, 08:51 AM
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I would likely die if I had to turn it off for 24 hours. I live on the gulf coast and I'd drown due to the high humidity. I might could turn it off for 2 or 3 hours during the day or overnight though. If it didn't thaw in that amount of time I'd be surprised, because it feels like 98 out there today. What do you think?
 
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Old 06-09-15, 10:54 AM
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Oh OK, you have 2 units. do both units have low airflow?
 
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Old 06-09-15, 11:27 AM
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It is totally amazing to me that far too many so-called Techs do not realize the importance of adequate airflow though the indoor coil; without which there will not be adequate removal of heat because the coil will be under heat-loaded.

What year was the condenser mfg'ered?

Simple easy anyone can do ways to check the performance of your central air conditioner; if needed; you can call an Energy Efficiency HVAC Technician or some power companies may do some of it.

If U want me to run a ballpark analysis of how your system is performing in respect to its ‘Nominal Rated Btuh’ I need at least the following numbers.

You will need to call a good HVAC Contractor to fix the performance problems we find.

Performance Data Collection – Best Time to collect data is late afternoon around +4:30 pm, when attic is HOT; also when outdoor temps are around 85F to 95F.

*All U need is a good air-temp probe thermometer (digital reading in tenths preferable) and a low cost 'Indoor Humidity Gauge' you can get at Walmart or most hardware stores or over the Internet.

1) Helpful: condenser 'Tonnage' & SEER Rating of Unit &/or model number:
FIRST; We need to know the 'Indoor' % of Relative Humidity______ %

2) TXV or, orifice metering device? _______. Only if U know; not critical…

3) Outdoor condenser’s discharge-air-temperature ___F

Subtract Outdoor air temperature: _____F

Outdoor Condenser Air-Temp-Split ___F

4) Need the ‘Indoor’ percent of relative humidity - in the middle of the rooms or, at Return-Air inlet grilles ___

5) Indoor Return-Air Temperature ___ F

Subtract Indoor Supply-Air Temperature __F

Indoor temperature-split ___F

First, make sure the return air filter is clean, and then you should get a digital probe thermometer that reads in tenths degrees, (though U can use any mercury thermometer) and a low cost percent relative 'humidity gauge 'to check the 'indoor' humidity level. ACU-RITE around a mere $8.89 at Walmart here in Prairie Du Chien, WI

If you have an air conditioner that was manufactured between 1992 and 2005 it will 'probably be' a 10 or 12 SEER (though some were higher SEER even back then) R-22 refrigerant units.

When the temperature reaches around + 80 to 95F outdoors and the indoor temperature is say 80F and the relative humidity indoors' is right around 50% RH the outdoor condenser temperature split should be around 20 to 21F above the outdoor temperature.

If the indoor temperature is 75 and the relative humidity is 50% then the air discharge temp-split off the condenser should be around 17F.

The indoor temperature split between the return-air at the supply air grille closest to the air handler @50%RH should be around 19 to 21F temperature drop (split) with either an 80F or 75F indoor temperature. This is also the indoor split with the higher SEER units at 13 SEER or above.

If the indoor temperature split is too high may have very low airflow which needs to be brought up to its normal CFM Rate.

If the outdoor condenser split is too high your air handler may be drawing hot outdoor air into the return from the attic causing the high condenser discharge air temperature; or it has dirty coils or lack of ambient airflow through the coils, check for cottonwood if trees are in the area.
If system is working right; High indoor humidity will increase the condenser split.

On the new air-conditioning systems & any systems at 13 SEER or higher, the outdoor condenser split is lower than it is on the 10 to 12 SEER units; the indoor temp-split is the same.

New 13-SEER units have a condenser temp-rise 'at above conditions' of close to 17F; a 16 or 18-SEER usually around 9 or 10F need model numbers for more definitive numbers.

If the temps are within +/- a degree or two, that air-conditioner is performing fairly well; if not, call an HVAC service contractor and show them your test results; tell them you want it to pass their Delivered Performance Test.
 
  #9  
Old 06-10-15, 06:41 AM
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Just one unit. I don't know why there are two vents... I thought it was strange, but a lot of the work done in this house is WEIRD.
 
  #10  
Old 06-10-15, 06:53 AM
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Two return vents is normal. I would open the furnace up and see if there is a filter in there. If there is, remove it and see if the airflow is better.
 
  #11  
Old 06-10-15, 06:55 AM
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Wow, that's a lot of really awesome information. I'll try my best to do all of what you're saying. Oh, and FYI, it's not even 9am and the outside temp is already almost 85
 
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