Had a tech come out for frozen evaparator coils


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Old 09-11-15, 05:24 AM
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Had a tech come out for frozen evaparator coils

Hi guys,

It turns out I needed freon for my unit..My AC unit is running like a new one now..But he said there is a 90 % chance I have a leak in my coils is the reason I need freon..Is that true?The unit is 11 yrs old.

Also I do notice a few rusts spots forming from the condensation on my coils and drain pan..Is there anything I can do to remove the rust?Spray it with WD 40??

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 09-11-15, 05:34 AM
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Freon just doesn't disappear so there are only 2 possibilities. Either it wasn't properly filled to begin with, or you have a leak somewhere.... maybe the coils, maybe somewhere else, but somewhere.

You can remove the rust with a rust remover if you wish but it won't do anything for any leak.

You're in the USA so if the leak isn't bad then you can simply have a guy "top it off" every year or so... at least until it gets bad (and it probably will). Here in Canada "topping off" is illegal and the leak no matter how small MUST get tracked and fixed before a refill can happen.
 
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Old 09-11-15, 05:46 AM
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He told me theres no way to fix/seal a leak.Is that correct?
He said most likey the leak is in the evaporator coils because of the rust.He stated that you have to get a new coil system which runs about $1000.
 
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Old 09-11-15, 06:13 AM
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Did he look for the leak ?
 
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Old 09-11-15, 06:30 AM
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No he didnt look for a leak.
 
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Old 09-11-15, 06:49 AM
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While the leak could be in the evaporator coil, it could also be something as simple as a leaky schrader valve or a pinhole in one of the copper lines. As others have stated, an attempt should be made to try to find and repair the leak before refrigerant is added. Sometimes the leak is difficult/impossible to find, however the technician shouldn't give up without even trying to find it.
 
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Old 09-11-15, 06:57 AM
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Lets say the leak is in the evaporator coils.Is that sealable/fixable?He told me it wasnt
 
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Old 09-11-15, 07:53 AM
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An 11 year old evaporator coil would not be considered a repairable item.
 
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Old 09-11-15, 01:10 PM
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Whats the normal life expectancy of a AC unit?
To me 11 yrs isnt that long.
 
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Old 09-11-15, 06:54 PM
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Normal expectancy could be 20 years.
Your coil failed before the normal expectancy.... it happens.

The reason I say at that age it's not considered a repairable item is due to the cost. The system needs to have the refrigerant evacuated. The coil would more than likely need to be removed for repair. Then repaired/resoldered if even possible. Reinstall and evacuate system and then recharge it.
 
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Old 09-13-15, 06:39 AM
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Not true in the US that we can continue to add refrigerant without finding a leak.
Geo
 
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Old 09-13-15, 06:50 PM
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Not true in the US that we can continue to add refrigerant without finding a leak.
I'm sorry (to both you and the environment) but that is incorrect.
It is true. You are allowed to "top off" (refill without a leak repair) provided the leak releases less than 15% per year. I don't agree with it. IMO, Topping off should be illegal everywhere. It certainly is in Canada.... but that's just my opinion.

From EPA (systems greater than 50 lbs charge):
For the commercial (e.g. grocery stores and warehouses) and industrial process refrigeration sectors, leaks must be repaired within 30 days when the equipment leaks at a rate that would release 35 percent or more of the charge over a year. For all other sectors, including comfort cooling (such as building chillers), leaks must be repaired when the appliance leaks at a rate that would release 15 percent or more of the charge over a year.
Systems less than 50Lbs charge are exempt
The leak repair regulations do not apply to refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment with refrigerant charge sizes less than 50 pounds (such as residential split air-conditioning systems). However, smaller equipment is not exempt from the refrigerant venting prohibition. EPA regulations prohibit the intentional release of all refrigerants during the maintenance, service, repair, or disposal of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment.
http://www.epa.gov/ozone/title6/608/608fact.html#leaks
 

Last edited by Bob Sanders; 09-13-15 at 07:06 PM.
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Old 09-14-15, 05:12 AM
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Just thinking about this American law some more... you're allowed to leak it, but heaven forbid you should vent it! I guess the environment is smart enough to know the difference and not react to leaked refrigerant
 
 

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