Overflow pan repair?


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Old 10-01-15, 08:21 AM
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Overflow pan repair?

I had a clog in my condensation drain line, which caused water to go in my secondary drip pan under my unit, which in turn leaked before ever filling up enough to reach the secondary drain. The drip pan appears to be in good shape and has no rust. About a year and a half ago the whole air handler and furnace were replaced and my guess is that the pan somehow got punctured when that was done, but to my knowledge it's never had water in it so I can't say for sure. The unit is in my attic and because of the configuration it can't just be lifted up to replace the pan. According to the AC guy, it will have to be taken apart and that will be $600+ in labor to completely disassemble everything and then reassemble.
So my question is whether there is any kind of pour in coating that will fill small holes? I've found coatings that can be sprayed on or applied with a caulk gun such as Panseal, but since I can't reach under the unit and don't even know where the leak is, those won't really work. I need something I can pour in that will go everywhere that water will go and coat the entire bottom of the pan. Does anything like this exist?
My other option and maybe what I end up doing is to install a wet switch to just shut the unit off if water ever gets in the pan again. That costs about $40 for the switch and hopefully is simple enough for me to wire myself.

Any guidance or suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks
 
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Old 10-01-15, 03:55 PM
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Only thing that comes to mind is this.
TRAVACO Gluvit Epoxy Waterproof Sealer | West Marine
 
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Old 10-01-15, 09:20 PM
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Whether or not you opt to fix the leak..... install the safety switch anyway.
 
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Old 10-02-15, 03:30 AM
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I had my pan rust out, but that took 25 years to happen. We replaced it by nailing some boars across the roof rafters and using cargo straps fashioned a sling and suspended the unit in place. The pan was then easily removed and replaced. You will have to probably do some re-piping of the condensate line which is fairly straight forward. New pans are relatively inexpensive and can be bought at local plumbing and heating supply houses.

My gut tells me that there is probably a problem with the connection of the pipe to the pan that has failed and that may be your simple solution. Although you may have to pull the pan to figure that out anyway.
 
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Old 10-02-15, 05:31 AM
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The issue with replacing is that there is a rigid return run that comes straight out and is only about 8" long before connecting to the wall and you can't detach that without taking the whole thing apart because of where the screws are and everything stacks on top. There is also a rigid supply run on top that literally goes straight up to the rafter so there is no room for it to go up. The bottom return might flex some, but the top would not since it's vertical and would not compress any.

I did go ahead and order the switch and will be installing it regardless. I'm kind of amazed those aren't standard since even if the pan works as designed and holds the water, you want to know that water is in it and fix the problem.
 

Last edited by pamulli; 10-02-15 at 08:01 AM.
 

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