Window ac into 16x8 inch window


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Old 01-25-16, 08:42 AM
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Window ac into 16x8 inch window

I am buying a new shed that has windows in it that only open halfway so that the opening would be 16x8 inches. I already own two window ac units from before. So buying some brand new unit that might be smaller I would strongly like not to do. The shed is an 8x15 foot resin plastic shed and not wood as a wood shed will not work for my purposes. So I will have to build a support for the window ac unit so that no pressure in on that shed wall. The ac units are much bigger than the window opening. I could just not install the one window and be able to have a 16x16 window hole if need be. Since I have to build a support system for the ac unit anyway is it feasible to get the unit to work in that sized opening by fully installing the ac unit outside and boxing in and foam sealing the front to the window opening? How much box space would I need between the ac unit and the shed wall? Could I just put the section that blows in cool air through the opening and let the exhaust part just pull from outside. The shed already has two exhaust holes built into it? Thoughts? Thank you.
 
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Old 01-25-16, 10:32 AM
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My thought is, figure out an ideal location for the ac then frame a section of vertical wall inside the shed, anchored on top and bottom. Make the correct sized rough opening in this section of wall for your ac box (it has its own box, right?) Then once you have it built, cut out the wall of the shed and stick the ac box thru. It will be supported and secured to the wall you build. Then caulk the box to the siding. Be sure the box is sloped outward so condenstion will run outside. If the ideal spot is where a window is, remove the window completely first... then do the above.
 
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Old 01-25-16, 11:02 AM
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The inside of the shed will be a constant high humidity which is why I had to go with a resin shed instead of a wooden one, so framing a wall section inside the shed would invite mold on the frame. And using pressure treated wood isn't good for my project inside. Though I suppose cutting the wall section to size and building a support system outside is perfectly feasible, I was hoping to not need to cut any of the wall if at all feasible, if down the road I scrap my hobby project and decide to use it as a straight storage shed. And yes the window ac units have the metal boxing still attached. These units are like brand new almost.
 
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Old 01-25-16, 01:15 PM
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Assuming it would fit, I'd remove one of the windows to set the AC unit in and then fill in whatever is left over.
 
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Old 01-25-16, 01:58 PM
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Sounds to me like a job for one of these:



The a/c is freestanding but sucks/blows through a hose running out the window, so all you need is a porthole. This particular model is 10k BTUs and includes a dehumidifier. $320 at Home Depot, Store SKU # 379969. They come in lots of different sizes and IMHO are better hardware than traditional 'window' a/cs, which you're lucky to get two season's service out of.
 
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Old 01-25-16, 03:00 PM
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Fred, I have seen those in some houses. Where does the condensate go? Just curious.
 
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Old 01-25-16, 03:10 PM
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You can use metal studs.........
 
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Old 01-25-16, 04:29 PM
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Metal studs are not made to be load bearing.

Fred - I was hoping to not have to buy another ac unit, have two already from when we lived in a colder area that most homes didn't have central air. Plus that one would take up space I am hoping to use elsewise, if probable.
 
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Old 01-25-16, 04:32 PM
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Oh my gosh. Metal studs can hold up a little bitty air conditoner. Why ask for advice if you are stuck on your own idea?
 
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Old 01-25-16, 05:04 PM
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I never thoughts of metal studs so when you suggested them I googled them. The site said they weren't load bearing and its generally not recommended to even hang big mirrors on them. Though it also said some say you can. I don't know.
 
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Old 01-25-16, 05:16 PM
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Light gauge steel studs are not "load bearing" in the sense that you don't sit floor joists or trusses on top of them. Double 5/8" sheet rock is hung on this type of metal stud all the time, so I don't think a mirror would be a problem either. Don't know where you are getting your bad info.

There are also heavier gauge steel studs that ARE made for load bearing applications.
 
 

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