Can you replace the coils in an old A/C unit?


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Old 02-03-16, 12:17 PM
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Can you replace the coils in an old A/C unit?

So my AC unit actually works and it blows cold air. The problem is that it leaks really bad. I have the inside unit in a closet and it will just completely soak the filter and the floor. I had an AC guy look at it and he said the coils are destroyed and that is why the water is dropping onto the floor. He said it would be like $3000 to replace everything.

Is there any way to just replace the coils?

Thank you for any input or any other advice you might have.

i tried adding pics, but the forum wouldn't let me.
 
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Old 02-03-16, 12:35 PM
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What is the make and model number?
 
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Old 02-03-16, 02:28 PM
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It is a philco and model number is B3BV-030K-AB
 
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Old 02-03-16, 10:53 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Follow my link for picture posting. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html

Based on what I found that unit is around 12 years old. I could tell you exactly with a serial number. If that age is correct it would be a borderline call to replace just the coil.
 
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Old 02-04-16, 03:55 AM
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Might just need to have the coil pulled and cleaned. That is something that is done quite routinely where I am. Its not cheep. I'm around $300 to do it. I would call for a second opinion. At 12 years old it there is a decent chance it could be repaired.
 
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Old 02-04-16, 10:33 AM
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The Serial number is: b3d041004130
 
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Old 02-04-16, 10:40 AM
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Ok so I had an AC company send a guy over to take a look. I told them I just wanted the coils looked at to see if I could replace them. He walked in and looked at them and said the coils are toast and there is basically no point in replacing them and I should just buy a new inside and outside unit. Now I don't know if he is correct or if he is just trying to sell me a new unit?

I would love to pay $400-500 to get these coils fixed, but now I don't know if it's even possible. He told me I definitely shouldn't do it.
 
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Old 02-04-16, 02:37 PM
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Sounds like you just have a drain problem not a coil problem. If the coil is " destroyed" it wouldn't be cooling.
 
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Old 02-04-16, 05:37 PM
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Model - date - unique serial
B3D.....0410......04130

October 2004
 
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Old 02-04-16, 11:54 PM
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Clarification

An AC will not leak water. What happens is that the coils get cold and water vapor from the condenses and freezes on the coil itself. Then when the AC turns off the ice melts and then drains. If your AC is dripping water it's not draining properly or the drain is plugged. This sounds like a wall mounted ductless split. If your AC is leaking refrigerant there will be evidence in the form of oil where the leak is. The refrigerant will have to be recovered from the AC, the leak repaired if possible and then the system evacuated and then recharged. If the coil is made of copper you could repair the leak by pushing the aluminum fins away from the leak and brazing. Depends on how much you are comfortable doing. If you want to replace the coil in a ductless split your sill going to need to obtain the tools to do the recovery and evacuation and learn how to do that since I can't be giving away that trade secret on this site apparently... the main thing with the epa is that you don't simply vent CFC and HCFC in to the atmosphere. I would first start looking for a way to drain the water. The other thing is that if you are leaking and low on refrigerant it doesn't make sense that you have cold air coming out....
 

Last edited by Fridgey44; 02-05-16 at 12:00 AM. Reason: Typo
 

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