Where to put condensate pump with negative air pressure?


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Old 04-29-16, 07:38 AM
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Where to put condensate pump with negative air pressure?

I have been having to have a crash course on condensate lines. I just had some HVAC people move my furnace back about 12 inches. For some reason when the house was built it was installed in the middle of the laundry room blocking any way of putting a door into the house, so I have to go through the garage to get to the laundry room. The plan is to move the furnace out of the way and put in the door. To do so I may need to install a condensate pump to go up and over the doorway to get back to the drain.

Now it is moved and I have plenty of room to put in a door to the house, however, about four hours later I found water on the floor. When moving the furnace he cut off most of the condensate drain pipe and pointed it to a bucket until I could get a condensate pump. There was some water in the bucket but there did not appear to be any water coming out of the drain after watching it for awhile. As soon as I turned off the furnace, a bunch of water came out. I was suspicious that because the drain is on the return side that it could be that the p trap was removed causing the suction of air to block the water. After some research I realized the p traps are a must, not sure why the guys I hired didn't mention it.

The main question is, keeping in mind the drain has a negative pressure suction, what will be the setup for the drain line. I see a few possible setups and not sure which is right.
1. HVAC, p-trap,pump, ptrap, sewage line
2. HVAC, pump, ptrap, sewage line
3. HVAC, ptrap, pump, sewage line
4. HVAC, pump, sewage line (wasnt sure if the pump/resevior itself acts a ptrap)

Which of these would be the proper setup to prevent air suction into the drain pan and blocking sewer gas from entering the HVAC?
 
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Old 04-29-16, 08:01 AM
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You need a trap on the air handler to keep the air from moving thru the drain line. These are just some pics I grabbed offline....

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The condensate leaves the air handler, travels thru the trap and drips into the condensate pump. The condensate pump is not sealed. Based on your plumbing... the drain line from the pump should be directed into a properly set up trap attached to your home plumbing.
 
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Old 04-29-16, 08:06 AM
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Thanks. Whether or not the pump was sealed was something I wasnt sure about. Until I get a pump I can craft some sort of p trap and drain to a bucket.
 
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Old 04-29-16, 08:34 AM
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Not really a p trap. If you want to temp one......... pick up several 3/4" PVC 90's and some pipe.
The fittings don't even need to be glued right now.

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