ac unit tripped circuit breaker, is diagnoses of problem correct?

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Old 10-03-17, 01:20 PM
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ac unit tripped circuit breaker, is diagnoses of problem correct?

I am back again two months later. My last problem in July involved my freon leaking. I had the leak fixed (broken valve) and the freon replaced. Now I have a larger issue.

Last week my ac was running, but not cooling. I didnt want to deal with it at night so I just shut it off. The next morning I turn it on again and look outside and see my ac unit's fan is not running. I then went to my circuit breaker box and see the breaker has been tripped and it's in the neutral position. I try to reset it, pushing it off then attempt to switch it to on with no luck. I then call an a/c guy who a contractor friend of mine recommended.

He comes out and he gets the circuit breaker turned back to the "on" position to get electricity flowing again. I should of asked him, but how did he do that?

After opening the unit he uses two probes to test for electrical current. One probe is on one metal pipe while he tests 3 connectors on the compressor. Two of these connectors come back as no current. The third, however, shows electrical current. He then tells me that there must be a loose wire inside the compressor which is then causing my circuit breaker to trip and so the compressor is bad, thus meaning the entire unit needs to be replaced.

I am a complete dummy when it comes to ac units. So I guess what I'm asking is does this sound like a reasonable explanation? I've done a bit of research on ac units and have looked at flow charts for solving this kind of issue and it just seemed to me odd that it was diagnosed so quickly like in under 5 minutes without going through some of the steps listed on these flow charts I've seen. Maybe I'm in denial that my ac unit is shot and that is why I'm so skeptical.

In any case, after reading this, do you think it is worth my while to get a 2nd opinion or does the explanation provided seem reasonable? I really do appreciate the time you've taken to read this and to respond.

One more question which I might not want to know the answer to. In order to save a bit of money, when they guy replaced the ac freon in July he offered me a cheaper alternative that was a mix of new and old types of freon. Could this have caused my compressor to overheat, or does that have absolutely nothing to with my problem?
 

Last edited by ap333; 10-03-17 at 01:39 PM. Reason: one more question
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Old 10-03-17, 01:47 PM
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If he was measuring resistance and he found continuity from ground to one of the compressor terminals..... he should have found it at the others too. If he did in fact find a short from one terminal to ground..... then the compressor is internally shorted.

cheaper alternative that was a mix of new and old types of freon
That could certainly be an issue..... especially since we have no idea what was mixed in.
 
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Old 10-03-17, 02:02 PM
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@pjmax I just looked at the receipt I got from back in July when the freon was replaced. It is listed as NU-22 on the receipt at $70 per unit (5 units total), but I know that it was mixed with another, less expensive freon (maybe the newer type?) as well because I believe the original price he quoted me was around $110 per unit. I specifically asked him if this was ok to do and seemed ok with doing it stating he's done it before. The HVAC guy in fact he offered this up as he knew I was tight on money. Should I have not done this? At the time I was completely comfortable with doing it after he gave me an explanation. This is really bumming me out right now knowing I could have or was likely to cause my ac to fail by not getting the more expensive freon. I'm assuming I dont have any type of recourse at this point?

Regarding the short, he showed me the meter showing no electrical flow from one of the terminals and electrical flow from the third, so I guess it is internally shorted?
 
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Old 10-03-17, 02:08 PM
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Was the other tech just there in July ?
Get him back to diagnose his work.
 
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Old 10-03-17, 07:06 PM
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@pjmax Sorry but I was confusing myself and didnt remember things correctly about refilling my freon back in July. He ONLY put in 5 units of NU22 and did not flush out any r22 that was already in the ac unit. That was the part I was getting confused ie the combining of freon. From my understanding talking to a HVAC guy, putting the NU22 in the ac would not have caused my compressor to fail. If I'm wrong about that, let me know and I'll go from there. Thanks for all your help.
 
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Old 10-03-17, 08:57 PM
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Apparently the NU22 causes seals to shrink and accelerates refrigerant leaks. There are some select companies that don't allow the NU22. Units with Copeland scroll compressors is one.

I would doubt using that refrigerant was the cause of the problem.

You didn't respond to me asking about that tech returning. It would be nice to have a second opinion on the compressor issue.

Unless you have a meter and want to check the compressor.
 
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