Confused on A/C wiring options

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  #1  
Old 07-21-18, 03:17 PM
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Confused on A/C wiring options

https://photos.app.goo.gl/QkQDb1uGQgDExzZ36
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The photos above are pictures of the equipment that I am dealing with. I have a mobile home with a split AC system that went out. I'm replacing it with a gpc1424h41ec 2 ton 14 seer Package unit. It has a field install option for a heat strip which I ordered as well. I will be completing the install myself. I currently have a 60 amp breaker (that the existing unit was tied to) in my panel and no open spots to add additional breakers. The heat strip comes with a 40 amp breaker. The package unit recommends a 20 amp breaker. I will be installing a manual disconnect at the unit with a 60 amp pull-type and no fuses. The wire that runs to the disconnect will be about 30 ft long from the circuit breaker in the panel. My question is what gauge that wire should be and what size breaker should I have in the panel? It seems as though I would need a 20 amp breaker in the electrical panel and run the wire to the disconnect and then the disconnect to the unit for overload protection at the right amount but then how does the heat strip get its power? If the heat strip is pulling 30 amps with a 40 amp breaker then that would be too much for a 20 amp breaker to support it as well. The breaker on the heat strip is connected so that it should be installed within the unit so it would either need its own power supply or I keep the 60 amp fuse in the breaker and use that to power the heat strip and the unit but then there's no 20 amp breaker for the unit. Do I install another one of those separately somewhere else? I've done a lot of digging trying to find the right answer so I'm hoping somebody on here can really help me out. Thank you so much!

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Last edited by PJmax; 07-21-18 at 04:56 PM. Reason: added four cropped/resized/reoriented pics from links
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  #2  
Old 07-21-18, 03:27 PM
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Here are instruction for posting pictures.
 
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Old 07-21-18, 04:59 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

You need a 240v 40A circuit and a 240v 20A circuit and you have a single 240v 60A circuit.
You will need to install a weatherproof sub panel on that 60A line with a 2P40A and a 2P20A breaker.
Those breakers will become your service disconnects.
 
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Old 07-21-18, 05:01 PM
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Did you purchase the single point wiring kit? That should let you have the same setup as before - a single 60 amp breaker in the panel and a single feed to the unit. The SPK splits power between the heat strips and rest of unit.
 
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Old 07-22-18, 06:33 AM
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Thank you for the replies and I tried to post the photos below using the directions provided in the response to my original post but I do not have those options when viewing through my phone. It only allows me to add a link but then I got an error message when I copied the link into the link box. So I was forced to copy the link into the text box as I did in my original post again. Sorry if this is causing a problem viewing the photos. I have attached 3 photos showing the outdoor sub panel box that I'm considering and just wanted to make sure that it would work for the application I am needing it for. Thank you for pointing me in that direction. Also, I have attached a couple of tables that I need some clarification around with the single point wiring kit. Since the unit itself is needing a 20 amp breaker and the heat strip is needing a 40 amp breaker (which it already has as it comes wired this way from the factory) then which single point wiring kit do I need? The chart says that I need a 40 amp single point kit for the heat strip that I have. But would that change based on the fact that the breaker inside is a 60 amp (that the power would be coming from) and also would it change with the unit needing a 20 amp breaker? What I read about the single point kits made it a little confusing since the description said that it was for larger heat strips with multiple connections. Do I get a single point wiring kit and install it inside the sub panel box and install both the 40 amp breaker for the heat strip and the 20 amp breaker for the unit inside the panel box with the single point wiring kit inside the box as well? If I did this then I would be running the branch circuit from the 60 amp breaker inside to about 30 feet where the sub panel box would be located to the single point wiring kit and then branch out from there to the to breakers that I would be installing inside the box. If I did this, then I would have easy access to the 40 amp breaker without having to remove a panel in case it flipped in the future but then I would need to separate it from its pre wired design since it is currently attached from the factory to the heat strip right now. Alternatively, I guess I could run a wire from the 60 amp breaker inside to the outdoor sub panel box about 30 feet away and have 2 power supply wires coming off of the 60 amp sub panel box I already have that has the manual disconnect that I was planning to install outside and run one power feed to the 40 amp breaker for the heat strip and then a second power feed to a 20 amp breaker that I could install inside the panel of the unit. That was just a thought but I wanted to get some feedback on it as to what might be best. Either way, would I have to do anything special for grounding? I know the main panel inside is grounded but I didn't plan on running a long ground wire to the sub panel box. It seems as though I would need to install another ground rod at the sub panel box. Would this be correct? I appreciate all the help! I will also need direction as to wire size depending on the route that is suggested. Thank you!

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Old 07-22-18, 07:40 PM
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First you should slow down, gather your thoughts and maybe separate you concerns into different paragraphs as what you have posted appears overwhelming.

If you get a single feed kit you don't need a panel, only a disconnect. The single point kit mounts inside the unit so you only would need two hots and a ground feeding the unit. There is a totally different type of SPK for large heat coils that is confusing things. If you want to go the SPK route you should contact the place you bought the unit to find out what the correct SPK .

Any disconnect or panel should not have a ground rod. You should only need a ground wire (also called grounding conductor) from the main panel along with the two hot wires (ungrounded conductors).
 
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Old 07-24-18, 05:36 AM
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If I have a 60 amp breaker going to a 60 amp disconnect going to a single point kit then I should be able to string all of that together with just one hot wire, correct?

From there, I would need two hot wires coming from the single point kit located inside the unit feeding the unit itself and also the heat strip, correct?

The breakers should be located inside the unit immediately after the single point connect, correct?

If I'm understanding what the single point kit does correctly then the above setup is what is making sense to me. However, if I am wrong, would you please educate me why? I am trying to learn and asking an expert is a great way so I appreciate the patience as I get up to speed!
 
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Old 07-24-18, 07:39 AM
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Sounds like you've got the idea for the single point kit. It would be a single cable with two hots (L1 and L2) and a ground.

The single point kit should contain all wiring needed to feed the heat coils and unit.

Take a look at installation similar to yours:
https://www.alpinehomeair.com/relate...structions.pdf and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzNvCWp8a-o
 
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