How Fast Should My Apartment Cool Down?

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-27-18, 12:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question How Fast Should My Apartment Cool Down?

Hi. I live in a 1100 sq ft apartment on the 3rd floor in Texas where the outside temperature gets up to around 100 during the summer. From a starting indoor temperature of 70 degrees Fahrenheit, what is your opinion on what length of time would be normal to cool the apartment down 5 degrees from 70 to 65? It feels like it takes longer than it should, but I don't know if my expectations are unrealistic. Thanks in advance for your help!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-27-18, 12:54 PM
airman.1994's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 5,767
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
At 100 outside it will run well into the night tell the outside temp cools. (Unit should never cut off) Also the unit is most likely not sized to hit 65. that real cold.
 
  #3  
Old 07-27-18, 12:58 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for your feedback. Let's say just a couple of degrees, 71-69 for instance. How long would be normal to cool just a couple of degrees?
 
  #4  
Old 07-27-18, 03:21 PM
Bob14525's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 1,470
Received 11 Votes on 8 Posts
Originally Posted by actor2120 View Post
Thank you for your feedback. Let's say just a couple of degrees, 71-69 for instance. How long would be normal to cool just a couple of degrees?
A lot depends upon the relative humidity inside the apartment. If the humidity is relatively high (>55%), a lot of the cooling goes to dehumidfication. Once the humidity is in the 50% range, you should see the rate of cooling (temperature drop) increase.

In addition to the humidity issue, it also depends upon the heat load. If you have sunshine streaming into the apartment and/or have "leaky" windows or insufficient insulation, it will cool slower. Being on the third floor doesn't help either (heat rises). Also, as others have mentioned, you're asking for an unusually low temperature. The lower the desired temperature, the longer it will take as you're approaching the minimum achievable temperature. FWIW, I have my thermostat set to 73 degrees, which is lower than most people choose.
 
  #5  
Old 07-27-18, 06:12 PM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: SW Fla USA
Posts: 11,808
Received 29 Votes on 23 Posts
FWIW, I would have to wear long pants and a sweatshirt if I ran my ac below 70; we run ours (SW Fla, Gulf coast) at 80 comfortably. I think our unit would run 24 hours a day trying to stay down at 70.
 
  #6  
Old 07-28-18, 03:03 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 9,980
Received 8 Votes on 8 Posts
Unlike an oven, your air conditioner is not meant to be turned on and off, especially in hot weather.
As said, half of an air-conditioner's capacity is used to reduce humidity.
You would do well to leave it on then raise and lower the temperature slightly when the space is unoccupied.

The added cost to operate it will be minimal because it does not have to work as hard as it does when using it as you have been.
 
  #7  
Old 07-28-18, 06:18 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,019
Received 55 Votes on 50 Posts
I would expect an 1100 square feet home around here, Michigan, to take at least a couple of hours to cool down a couple of degrees. Toss in Texas, where your average heat index is presumably higher, 3rd floor, with heat rising from the units below, and an apartment, where the walls between units probably do not have near the insulation of a standalone home, not to mention that the quality, or at least regularity of maintenance on the unit may not be up to par with that of a properly maintained home unit, and I would not be surprised at all for it to take close to all night to drop that much. 5 degrees, well, significantly longer. Think of everything you have as a heat sink. Hot moves to cold, so as the air begins to cool the sofa, bed, appliances, etc. radiate heat back into the space, and that goes on as long as it takes for everything to cool down. Also keep in mind the humidity, as was mentioned. Conditions vary, obviously, but I try to keep our home at about 76 in the summer, and there are days when that feels a little warm, but there are also days when the humidity is higher, so I can drop it down a degree or two in order to have it run and take the humidity out and still not reach a chilly point.
 
  #8  
Old 07-30-18, 11:38 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the feedback everyone! I really appreciate it!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: