Torque specs for fan grille on Bryant ac unit

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Old 08-10-19, 08:59 PM
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Torque specs for fan grille on Bryant ac unit

I have the following:
Bryant Preferred Series, 18 Seer, Model 167A
Serial# 3409E19855
Prod# 167ANA048000DAAA
Model# 167ANA048-A

The condenser jackets velcro fasteners have came off on one side, I'd like to get in there and reglue the peice that came off. Wondering if there are torque specs/ requirements for the bolts that hold the fan grille on?
I know most guys say just tighten it up for practically everything and ignore specs...in my time on this earth I have stripped so many things over tightening that I have became best friends with a torque wrenches, and this is a good example of something I do not want to strip or leave unevenly tightened / out of balance.
 
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Old 08-10-19, 09:02 PM
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As far as I know..... there are no torque specs for that.

Bryant 167ANA (pdf)
 
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Old 08-11-19, 07:54 AM
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Hi, doubt itís that important, but I would find he screw size and see what the torque specís are for it.
Geo
 
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Old 08-11-19, 08:40 AM
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Virtually any threaded fastener has a torque spec, and depending on what you are working on you can find a lot of applications where a torque wrench is necessary, but for every one time that a torque wrench is necessary there are dozens if not hundreds of applications in which a torque wrench is not only not necessary but essentially irrelevant. I doubt that anyone here hasn't stripped something at some point in time, I know I have, and quite a few more than once, so you learn from it. But to torque every fastener you run across is not the answer, and certainly not practical. Ever dealt with a loose door handle in your home? I can't tell you the torque spec for those screws, but I can tell you that too loose isn't good, too tight sometimes binds, and the sweet spot is someplace in between. Take the screws you're working on as an example. Sure, the screws have a spec, but I'm thinking that they're self tapping screws that go into a punched hole, right? So did any of those holes leave the factory exactly the same? And how much has rust or corrosion affected the mechanical connections? Some undoubtedly came out easier than others, and you'll have that same inconsistency when you put them back in. No, I wouldn't worry about torquing them, but what you might get if you don't have it is a screwdriver handle for running your small sockets, to use in place of the ratchet, or a set of nut drivers with screwdriver handles. Then put your screws in to just the point of snug, and you'll be fine.
 
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Old 08-12-19, 12:11 PM
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Thank you for the doc PJmax.
 
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Old 08-12-19, 12:20 PM
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Geochurchi - that is what I'll do.
 
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Old 08-12-19, 01:31 PM
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aka pedro - I'm not a complete spaz with the torque wrench, there are more applications that I don't use one than I do use one. If a spec is available for something going into sheet metal, like this I'd use torque wrench. A bolt or screw going into an aluminum base, or just about anything on a vehicle, I always look for a spec.
I'll look for the spec for the screw size but will probably end up using a nut driver like you suggest and try to keep them even by feel. I just don't want to strip that sheet metal.
 
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Old 08-12-19, 02:07 PM
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Nope, never crossed my mind that you were a spaz or whatever. I agreed that virtually any threaded fastener has a torque spec, and frankly have seen an awful lot of goof ups, including some quite costly and critical ones that could have been avoided if the person(s) involved had paid more attention to how much torque was required. And yes, even things like "simply putting the grill back on" aren't so simple if you have to cobble it back together because you stripped the screw out. I get it, and no criticism intended.
 
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Old 08-13-19, 04:32 AM
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Hi, I often tighten fasteners with my left hand just to be sure I donít strip or break something.
But thatís me.
Geo
 
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