Water splashing from condensate pump


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Old 05-25-20, 04:17 PM
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Water splashing from condensate pump

I have a condensate pump on my AC and when the AC is running, water inside condensate pump splashes from the air escaping from condensate drain.
Unused hole is covered with a rubber plug. Just removed to take a picture. Splashing water is coming out from small gap between the condensate pump and 1' PVC drain.
Previous owner had news paper under the pump. Now I know why..

Condensate drain into condensate pump is at about half height of the tank. Is it supposed to be longer or shorter?

Should I just get a condensate pump with larger tank?
 
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Old 05-25-20, 05:24 PM
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You need a trap in the line. That will allow the water to drain out but no air.
 
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Old 05-25-20, 05:55 PM
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Considering amount and pressure of air blowing out, I'm pretty sure water in regular condensation trap (a simple bent PVC type) will be pushed right out. A deeper trap will probably work, but pre-made deep traps seem some what expensive.
Is it ok to make trap out of 90s? Found some pictures of people doing that on google. Not sure if that actually is ok.
 
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Old 05-25-20, 06:26 PM
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Traps out of 90's are fine. Nothing is critical.
 
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Old 05-27-20, 04:55 PM
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Made a deep trap out of 90s and this worked out great.
No more splashes.

I also added a union for easy removal later for cleaning or replacement of condensate pump. The pump label says it was made in 92, still working fine, but probably almost at the end of its life.

I cut discharge end inside of the pump in 45 angle to prevent possible air lock.
 
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Old 05-27-20, 05:03 PM
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Excellent job. Name:  thumb.jpg
Views: 273
Size:  1.6 KB Nice and neat.

Those pumps do last quite a while. It depends a lot on how clean they are kept.
They can be taken apart and cleaned internally.

See those two blue wires coming out of the pump ?
Those connect to an internal float.
Typically those two wires interrupt one of the wires to the condenser.
If the pump craps out and fills up.... the blue wires open and shut down the condenser.
 
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Old 05-27-20, 06:27 PM
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I did clean the pump when I put the floor in winter, there wasn't much in there.
I also put new drain tubing because I relocated laundry sink, where the condensate pump was discharging to.

I was going to install that safety float switch as well, but I wasn't able to. Control board is inside blower cage, but exhaust vent pipe is in the way because my house has duct work under the slab and furnace is installed upside down. Cannot remove the cover without undoing the vent.
I could cut the wire in the middle and splice there, but it just isn't as neat as I want.
 
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Old 05-27-20, 07:33 PM
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After a few hours of thoughts... I just decided to cut the thermostat wire inside furnace, but before the control board and splice safety switch in.
Spliced onto yellow wire from thermostat instead of condenser wire. I think this is the best way. Is there any advantage of cutting just condenser only or cutting power to thermostat (cutting red wire) ?
Would been neater to splice near the control box, but undoing vent just didn't feel worth it.

It still is better than how some HVAC techs do.. I have seen them making splices outside of HVAC unit.
Also, I often see HVAC techs not connecting safety switch (including my house). Any reason why? Just lazy? Job security?
 
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Old 05-27-20, 07:36 PM
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Better to be protected from floods.
 
 

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